Posts Tagged ‘UCSF Medical Center’

Oh Hell Yes: UCSF Allows Emergency Room Check-In Online – Wait Just 15 Minutes with InQuickER Service at Parnassus

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

The average wait for an emergency room visit at UCSF‘s Parnassus Heights campus is 4.5 hours for people with mild medical emergencies? Wow.

Wouldn’t it be nicer to pay $5 to check-in online and then wait at home rather than in the ER?

That’s what UCSF thinks.

Check it:

“UCSF patients with minor medical needs seeking treatment in the Emergency Department now can make an appointment to be seen – waiting at home rather in the hospital – via a new online check-in service called InQuickER.

UCSF Medical Center
UCSF Medical Center is now offering patients with mild medical emergencies a chance to reserve a time to be seen in the Emergency Department using a new online system.

UCSF Medical Center’s Emergency Department (ED) at Parnassus Heights is now offering InQuickER designed for patients with non-threatening minor medical needs.

UCSF patients can register online for a $4.99 fee and pick an open slot for an emergency room visit. The fee will be refunded if they’re not seen within 15 minutes.

In April, UCSF did a trial run with the online service, which 22 people used. UCSF Medical Center launched the system a few weeks ago.

“One thing we encountered during the trial was that a lot of patients were using it inappropriately,” said Jennifer Dearman, the Emergency Department’s patient care manager. “The online registration is screened by ED nurses and we have had to advise some patients to come directly to the ED. This service is for a fast-track kind of patient.”

“For example, a cancer patient on chemotherapy with a fever can have complicated issues and should be seen in the regular ED, so InQuickER is not appropriate for that person.”

Waiting at Home vs. Hospital

About 105 patients a day visit the emergency room at UCSF Medical Center on the Parnassus campus, Dearman said, and the average time between arrival and departure, for those not admitted to the hospital, is four-and-a-half hours.

That’s in keeping with the average wait in 2009 for ER patients throughout California: four hours and 34 minutes –  27 minutes longer than the U.S. average, according to a 2010 report by health care consulting firm Press Ganey.

Dearman said patient satisfaction was the main reason UCSF Medical Center adopted InQuickER. “It also helps us control the flow,” she said. “The general population doesn’t think the emergency room ever has slow times. But it does.”

UCSF is one of 55 health care facilities in 13 states partnering with InQuickER, said spokesman Chris Song. The service, based in Nashville, began in 2006 after its founder, Tyler Kiley, had to go to an emergency room and spent hours witnessing stasis and frustration.

“He just thought there had to be a better way,” Song said. “With our service, you still have to wait but you get to do it somewhere else. Like on your couch instead of being surrounded by other sick people.”

Song said InQuickerER provides patients with convenience, comfort and some level of control. And it allows emergency department staff to know who’s coming and what symptoms they have, so that they can better prepare.

“It can help reduce the burden of peak times and spread it out,” Song said. “It creates more efficiency and a better environment in the waiting room.”

So far, more than 10,000 people have used the service; 95 percent have been seen within the 15-minute window. In a triage situation, of course, even people who have registered will have to wait. When there are delays, users are notified through text messages and emails with updated projections on treatment times.

The service is available online at https://ucsfmedicalcenter.inquicker.com/. It is growing rapidly, Song said, which is not surprising: A study led by San Francisco General Hospital emergency physician Renee Hsia, MD, MSc, found that the number of hospital-based emergency departments in the United States is declining, despite an increase in the number of patients seeking emergency care.

The study by Hsia, an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine in the UCSF School of Medicine, was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in May. It reported that 27 percent of urban and suburban emergency rooms have closed in the last two decades.”

Hurray!

UC Regents Approve UCSF Mission Bay Med Center – Helipad-Equipped Hospital Coming in 2014

Friday, September 17th, 2010

Oh it’s on. The fundraising campaign to get the Medical Center at Mission Bay off the ground is going well enough, so the University of California Board of Regents just gave the go-ahead for the project. The next step will be the groundbreaking ceremony. 

(And oh, what’s the LEED rating? It’s Gold, baby. And oh, we’ve got choppers - a helipad is baked into the cake. Moving on…)

Putting cancer /women’s  / children’s medicine in Mission Bay will free-up UCSF Medical Center at Parnassus Heights to do other things. It will:

“…transition into focusing on high-end adult surgical and medical services, including emergency medicine.”

(So you Inner Sunset / Cole Valley NIMBYs now have been warned. Let’s hope the increase in wailing sirens won’t disturb your lives too much…) 

Anyway, turn up your speakers waaaaay loud (you’ll soon discover why) to see this short video from UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann and UCSF Medical Center CEO Mark Laret, if you want. 

And here’s the Mission Bay renderporn. Radar O’Reilly can already hear the choppers: 

 

Click to expand 

Here’s what the 183-bed UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital might look like. For the record, the naming rights went for $100,000,000: 

 

You can see it on the right here: 

 

Bon Courage, UCSF! 

All the deets: 

The University of California Board of Regents today unanimously approved funding plans for the new UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay. The board’s action is the final endorsement for the project, clearing the way for UCSF to break ground on a world-class hospital complex for children, women and cancer patients in the Mission Bay neighborhood, south of downtown San Francisco.  

“The Regents’ approval is a major milestone for UCSF and for our family of supporters throughout the community,” said UCSF Chancellor Susan Desmond-Hellmann. “It is hard to overstate the importance of the new medical center at Mission Bay, which will reinforce UCSF and the entire Bay Area as a hub of innovation, biotechnology and premier health care.”  

After nearly a decade of planning, site preparations are underway on the 14.5-acre parcel of land. Construction of the 878,000-gross-square-foot hospital complex will begin on schedule in December 2010, shortly after required state permits are expected to be issued. Upon completion in 2014, the 289-bed facility will set a new standard for patient- and family-centered health care, safety, sustainability and translational medicine.  

“Ten years ago, the UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay was a dream, but we are now ready to break ground and bring this vision to reality,” said Mark R. Laret, CEO of UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. “The greatest legacy of the Regents’ decision to approve this new medical center will be the thousands of patient lives that are saved or improved because of the cutting-edge medical care that will be provided in these facilities.”  

Ever more deets, after the jump 

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Skype Video and Voice Calling Program Comes to UCSF Med Center and Children’s Hospital

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010

The Future Is Now – virtual visits have come to UCSF. So now you can talk to your friend without having to worry about spreading the H1N1 flu or whatever else comes down the pike. Read all about it: 

UCSF Children’s Hospital and UCSF Medical Center have partnered with Skype to help connect hospital inpatients with family members and friends who are unable to visit in person. The innovative new collaboration is the first such partnershipbetween Skype and a hospital.

The Skype video and voice calling programis now available to all inpatients at the UCSF hospitals. Using designated laptop computers with Skype software delivered to the bedside, patients can have virtual visits with family and friends around the globe on a secure network. According to Lila Param, director of pediatric services at UCSF Children’s Hospital, Skype supports the healing process by overcoming geographical boundaries that can lead to a sense of isolation among patients.”

All the deets, after the jump

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As H1N1 Fears Subside, UCSF Hospitals are Once Again Open to Visiting Children

Wednesday, March 10th, 2010

Those kids crowding Moffitt Cafe at UCSF Medical Center / Children’s Hospital will now have Run of the House, more or less, ’cause the restrictions against child visitors just got eliminated. So, as of yesterday, the place is, once again, totally wide open, more or less, to visitors aged 15 and less. 

Not sure what other local hospitals are thinking these days, but UCSF says that Influenza activity has decreased considerably lately. Read all about it, below.

Godzilla menaces this huge architect’s model of UCSF under a glass box, so he’s always safe from H1N1. But runaway tow trucks, well, that’s a different story:

Moffitt Cafe is now released from its ragamuffin daycare role so it can return to being a haven for law students, a place of escape where legal scholars are free to hit on medical and pharmacological students and/or professionals in a target-rich environment. (At least that’s how the cafeteria was used back in the 90′s.)

Forthwith, the News of the Day:

UCSF Lifts Hospital Visitor Policy Restricting Children

March 09, 2010

UCSF Medical Center and UCSF Children’s Hospital are lifting their visitor age restriction, which prohibited visitors younger than 16 years old. The visitor policy is being lifted effective March 9, 2010.

Dr. Joshua Adler, chief medical officer at UCSF, said he believes the policy, implemented in November, and other strategies, such as vaccination of UCSF personnel, helped reduce the risk of hospital-acquired influenza.

Influenza activity has decreased considerably so that risk is now quite low, Adler said. In the hospital units where age restrictions are not usually in place, children now may visit. Unit-specific age restrictions, such as those in the intensive care units, may remain in effect, according to unit-based policy.

A requirement, however, remains in effect until March 31 that health care workers, who have not been vaccinated against both H1N1 and seasonal influenza, must wear a surgical mask while in patient care areas.

Adler thanked employees for their diligent infection control measures during the flu season. Record numbers of UCSF employees, faculty, residents, and students received flu vaccines this year, he said.

New UCSF Meta Study Proves Cigarette Smoking is a Risk Factor for Alzheimer’s Disease

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010

All right, a new UCSF Medical Center study shows that smoking cigarettes won’t help you avoid Alzheimer’s disease.

This might come as news to some people, especially to those who rely on tobacco-industry funding to show that tobacco helps people avoid Alzheimers.

Deets below.

UCSF, back in the day, along with the ur-N Judah:

Study Shows Cigarette Smoking a Risk Factor for Alzheimer’s Disease

February 02, 2010

A UCSF analysis of published studies on the relationship between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and smoking indicates that smoking cigarettes is a significant risk factor for the disease. After controlling for study design, quality of the journals, time of publication and tobacco industry affiliation of the authors, the UCSF research team also found an association between tobacco industry affiliation and the conclusions of individual studies. Industry-affiliated studies indicated that smoking protects against the development of AD, while independent studies showed that smoking increased the risk of developing the disease. 

Study findings were published online in the Jan. 29, 2010 issue (19:2) of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. An abstract of the paper is available online

Ever more deets, after the jump

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