Posts Tagged ‘upgrade’

OMG, Signs of a Renaissance at Our “Second Renaissance Revival” Federal Building at 50 Fulton – Hurray!

Wednesday, August 10th, 2011

OMG, it’s “Loin Stimulus,” finally.

These days, there are signs of life at the old Bakewell & Brown Federal Building at 50 Fulton. (Or “50 United Nations Plaza.” Why put the name of that failure all over the place? Yish. The address is 50 Fulton, IRL, right?)

See the workers up there? 

Click to expand

It’s what the Feds call “Recovery in Progress – Working for you. Working for San Francisco.” Gee, thanks, Feds!*

Groove on the architecture.

Looks nice from the inside:

Now, don’t get me started on Lawrence Halprin‘s failed United Nations Plaza, the Mistake by the Lake built atop Yerba Buena Cemetery:

“Halprin was the creative force behind the interactive, ‘playable’ civic fountains most common in the 1970s, an amenity which continues to greatly contribute to the pedestrian social experience in Portland Oregon, where “Ira’s Fountain” is loved and well-used, and which has been a chronic failure at the transient-ridden United Nations Plaza in San Francisco.”

And UN Plaza made the Hall of Shame. Oh well.

All the deets about 50 Fulton:

Significant events

1927: Congress approves $2.5 million for new San Francisco Federal Building
1930: City of San Francisco donates site for building
1934-1936: Building constructed
1975: United Nations Plaza construction commences
1987: San Francisco Civic Center designated a National Historic Landmark
2007: Building vacated
[edit]Building facts

Location: 50 United Nations Plaza
Architect: Arthur Brown, Jr.
Construction Dates: 1934-1936
Architectural Style: Second Renaissance Revival
Landmark Status: Designated a National Historic Landmark as a Contributing Building to the San Francisco Civic Center
Primary Material: Granite
Prominent Features:
Classical Facade with Upper-story Colonnade
Ornate Entrance Vestibule, Lobby, and Elevator Lobby
Naval Commandant’s Office

*Thanks for finally doing something with your aging hulk of a brokedown palace after all these years.

The People at Sitemeter Apologize, Attempt to Roll Back Forced Migration

Monday, September 15th, 2008

Sitemeter is a tool that lets you see how many people come to your website, usually. But on September 13, 2008, the people at Sitemeter started rolling out a new interface that proved unpopular for various reasons. (“Sitemeter sucks” was a typical comment, but I could never get that far along the migration process to see for myself.) 

So, the Sitemeter Team decided to roll back to the status quo ante [this is good] but they are having problems getting this done [this is bad]. Their entire website is down currently so it’s hard to read their apology from yesterday. See below for Sitemeter’s thoughts on this whole affair.

This is what “Sitemeter Classic” looked like, before the attempted migration: 

The word from SM. Come back soon, Sitemeter.

Our Apologies -

September 14, 2008 ·

Dear Valued SiteMeter Customers,

As you’re no doubt aware by now, we’ve chosen to roll back our website to the previous “classic” version. 

Based on some performance issues we were experiencing along with feedback from the community it appears we have pushed our new site live prematurely.

Our intention is and has always been to offer you, our customer’s better tools and more accurate data. Obviously we fell short of this.  The first thing we need to do, moving forward, is to roll out new product releases in parallel to our current platform.  This will give everyone a chance to try out, evaluate, and comment on our new concepts.

We would also like to take this opportunity to ask those of you who had issues or concerns with the new site to participate in future beta testing.  We had originally asked for Beta Tester in two of our newsletters sent earlier this year so we’re eager to build our beta group even larger.  If you’re interested in participating please send us an email using our support ticketing system with BETA TESTER in the subject line of your email.

In the near term we’ll be evaluating the performance issues and feedback from our community.  If you have additional input that would help us build you a better product we’d like to hear from you.

We apologize for the botched rollout and will do our best to make sure the next time we do this it has your full support and blessing.

Sincerely,

The SiteMeter Team