Posts Tagged ‘Wall Street’

How Many SFPD Cops Does It Take to Babysit 100 Occupiers at the 888 Turk Street Occupation Overnight? About 100?

Monday, April 2nd, 2012

As seen last night – some of the cops on the left and the occupiers on the right:

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Man, the cops were everywhere, as if they were getting ready for an early-morning raid…

The communique:

“On Sunday, April 1st, in solidarity with the Western Regional Advocacy Project’s “We Won’t Get Fooled Again” National Day of Action for the rights of the un-housed, Occupy SF working groups & affinity groups are liberating a vacant building and converting it into a social center, shelter and food bank for the people. We have already demonstrated, for 82 days, what is possible when a space is liberated and reclaimed. The encampments at 101 Market St and Justin Herman / B. Manning Plaza were successful experiments in non-hierarchical organizing where resources were shared in a gift economy and collective decisions made through consensus, while food, shelter and medical care were provided to the greater community.

This action on Sunday is not a temporary protest, but a permanent occupation intended to establish a social center. We will transform this vacant building into a productive and vibrant space, just as we did in the plaza occupation, and we wish others to take similar actions and more.

Wealth inequality is increasing, the environment is being destroyed, the police state and drug war are devastating our communities and social movements, while our foreign wars enrich the 1% at the expense of our troops and innocent civilians. In San Francisco alone, thousands sleep on the street while thousands of houses and apartments lay empty. From Chapel Hill to Seattle, from New York to Oakland, people are rising up to directly change the social and economic system by liberating vacant buildings and reclaiming them for the people.

We are taking this action to bring immediate relief and housing to homeless youth in our community, and to provide a space for assembling, sharing food and healing for all people.”

There’s No More Camping at OccupySF, But a Half-Dozen People Hang Out in Front of 101 Market Everyday, It Appears

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

This is what’s left of OccupySF, about six people hanging out in front of our Federal Reserve Building during lunchtime, that’s the update:

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On It Goes

Has the Former Location of OccupySF Now Become a Place for Rich City Workers to Park Their Jaguars?

Friday, December 23rd, 2011

Why yes, yes it has.

See?

This is the area betwixt the bocce ball courts and Don Chee Way, right where OccupySF used to be until Mayor Ed Lee cleared the place out:

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Isn’t it sad that all those hippies camping out for all those months left City workers no place to park their luxury English motorcahs, you know, for free?

Always remember, Transit First!

The Remnants of OccupySF: No More Camping in Front of the Federal Reserve Building at 101 Market Street

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011

This is all I could see around lunchtime yesterday:

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“Toxic Soil” From the Former OccupySF Encampment at Justin Herman Plaza Hauled Off – New Turf Rolls Out Tomorrow

Tuesday, December 13th, 2011

Do you know how many dogs died at OccupySF? I don’t but that’s Topic A whenever you discuss OccupySF with any member of our “City Family” these days.

The bocce ball courts are still shut down as DPW and RPD and who knows who all else set about fixing the place up and generating a seven-figure clean-up bill.

The old turf was put in four months ago. Mulching for the new turf:

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Thus ends OccupySF 2011.

UC Davis School of Law Professor Emeritus Cruz Reynoso to Chair Task Force on OccupyDavis Pepper Spray Incident

Monday, November 28th, 2011

Well here’s the news of the day:

“Former state Supreme Court Justice and UC Davis School of Law Professor Emeritus Cruz Reynoso is the first member of task force that will review report about UC Davis pepper spraying from ex-L.A. police chief William Bratton.”

I, for one, am prepared to allow our UC some breathing room on this one. Let’s give them a little while and then see what they come up with, on both this incident and the prior UC Berkeley baton incident, m’kay?

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“Cruz Reynoso chairs task force on pepper spray incident
Date: 2011-11-28
University of California President Mark G. Yudof announced today (Nov. 28) the appointment of former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso to chair the task force formed to address the pepper spraying of UC Davis students.Reynoso, a UC Davis law professor emeritus who was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2000, will be “absolutely fair,” Yudof said.The task force is part of UC’s efforts to address policing issues in the wake of the Nov. 18 pepper spraying of UC Davis students and other incidents involving law enforcement officers and protesters. Acting in response to a written request from UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi, Yudof last Tuesday announced that former Los Angeles police chief William J. Bratton would lead an independent fact-finding of the pepper spray incident and report back the results to him within 30 days.Bratton, who also led the New York City police department, now heads the New York-based Kroll consulting company as chairman. He is a renowned expert in progressive community policing. Assembly Speaker John A. Perez also had made a request to Yudof and UC Regents Chair Sherry Lansing for an independent investigation.Under the plan, Bratton’s report also will be presented to the task force that Yudof is forming, again at Katehi’s request. The task force will consist of a cross-section of students, faculty, staff and other UC community members. Reynoso is the first member named to the task force. The task force will review the report and make recommendations to Katehi on steps that should be taken to ensure the safety of peaceful protesters on campus. She will present her implementation plan to Yudof.

Reynoso, a farmworker’s son, rose from an Orange County barrio to become the first Latino to serve on the California Supreme Court. He has a bachelor’s degree from Pomona College and a law degree from UC Berkeley. His distinguished career includes serving as director of the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, a UCLA law school professor and as vice chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. He joined the UC Davis law school faculty in 2001 as the inaugural holder of its Boochever and Bird Chair for the Study and Teaching of Freedom and Equality.

In remarks at the regents meeting today, Yudof reiterated his support for protecting the right to peaceful protests on campus and emphasized that Bratton’s investigation will be independent.

Last Tuesday, in a separate effort, Yudof also appointed UC General Counsel Charles Robinson and UC Berkeley School of Law Dean Christopher Edley Jr. to lead a systemwide examination of police protocols and policies as they apply to protests at all 10 UC campuses. The review is expected to result in recommended best practices for policing protests across the 10 UC campuses.

For more information about how UC is addressing policing and protest issues, visit www.universityofcalifornia.edu/news/article/26713.”

Occupy Beijing: NMA-TV’s Take on the UC Davis Pepper Spraying is Just Too Funny – Thanks Taiwan!

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Here it is:

“Pepper Spray! A yummy and delicious form of crowd control.”

And here’s the best part – in Tiananmen Square:

Enjoy:

University of California President Mark Yudof Throws Down: New System-Wide Examination of Police Protocols

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

Well, first there was this:

And then there was this:

Via Louise Macabitas – click to expand

So. now there’s this:

President Yudof launches initiatives to address policing and protests

 University of California President Mark G. Yudof moved on two fronts today (Tuesday, Nov. 22) to address policing issues in the wake of the pepper spraying of UC Davis students and other incidents involving law enforcement officers and protesters.

Acting in response to a written request from UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi, Yudof agreed to conduct a thorough review of the events of Nov. 18 on the Davis campus.

As a first step, Yudof reached out to former Los Angeles police chief William J. Bratton to undertake an independent fact-finding of the pepper spray incident and report back the results to him within 30 days.

Bratton, who also led the New York City police department, now heads the New York-based Kroll consulting company as chairman. He also is a renowned expert in progressive community policing.

“My intent,” Yudof said, “is to provide the Chancellor and the entire University of California community with an independent, unvarnished report about what happened at Davis.”

Assembly Speaker John A. Perez also had made a request to President Yudof and UC Regents Chair Sherry Lansing for an independent investigation.

Under the plan, Bratton’s report also will be presented to an advisory panel that Yudof is forming, again at Katehi’s request. The panel will consist of a cross-section of students, faculty, staff and other UC community members.

The advisory panel, whose members will be announced at a later date, will review the report and make recommendations to Chancellor Katehi on steps that should be taken to ensure the safety of peaceful protesters on campus. She will present her implementation plan to President Yudof.

On a second track, Yudof appointed UC General Counsel Charles Robinson and UC Berkeley School of Law Dean Christopher Edley Jr. to lead a system-wide examination of police protocols and policies as they apply to protests at all 10 UC campuses.

This effort will include visits to campuses for discussions with students, faculty and staff, and consultation with an array of experts.

The review is expected to result in recommended best practices for policing protests across the 10 UC campuses.

“With these actions,” Yudof said, “we are moving forward to identify what needs to be done to ensure the safety of students and others who engage in non-violent protests on UC campuses. The right to peaceful protest on all of our campuses must be protected.”

“Portrait Gallery: Faces of Occupy San Francisco” from KQED News Photo Intern Michelle Gachet

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

Here’s your invitation:

“At KQED, we’ve found ourselves wondering, who exactly is still at Occupy San Francisco two months into the movement and several days before the Thanksgiving holiday. Hardcore activists? Homeless people who have found a welcoming community? Nine-to-fivers who have taken time off to support the Occupy movement? 

In an effort to find out, KQED News intern Michelle Gachet visited Justin Herman Plaza on Monday to capture portraits of some of the movement’s members and their environs. Take a look…”

Occupier Emma Stime, for one, and her sleepy pooch:

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Click on over to see the entire gallery.

Come meet OccupySF 2011.

UC Regent Chair Sherry Lansing Throws Down: “Shocked and Appalled” by UC Davis Pepper Spraying

Monday, November 21st, 2011

Hey look it’s University of California Regent Chair Sherry Lansing on YouTube’s UC-TV:

It’s only at 25 views so far, but it’s worthy of your perusal, I’d say.

All the deets:

“UC Board of Regents chair Sherry Lansing says in a video statement that she is “shocked and appalled” by the images of police actions during recent student protests at UC Berkeley and UC Davis.

Lansing supports UC President Mark Yudof’s effort to review systemwide procedures so that students can engage in peaceful protests.

“We regents share your passion and your conviction for the University of California,” Lansing says. “We want all of you to know that we fully and unequivocally support your right to protest peacefully.”

Lansing also invites the people to express their views at the Board of Regents meeting on Nov. 28. The rescheduled meeting will be open to the public and connected by a teleconference with regents participating from UC San Francisco-Mission Bay, UCLA, UC Davis and UC Merced. As usual, the meeting will also be streamed online. The public comment period has been expanded from 20 minutes to at least one hour.”