Posts Tagged ‘war’

Western Addition Update: Entrance Wound, McAllister Street, NoPA – You Can Paint Over the Bullet Holes, But They’re Still There

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

Redolent of Brooklyn DA Goodman, I am concerned over the possibility of another gang war, lately, in the NoPA part of the Western Addition. We’ll see.

All the action seems to take place on Divisadero, or within a half-block of Divisadero, as here.

Four dollar toast, 40 cent bullets:

7J7C9408 copy

Wow, the Lyft vs. Uber Wars are Really Picking Up – As Seen on Market – “Drive for Lyft, Collect $500″ and a Taco!

Wednesday, July 9th, 2014

Now this is from a few weeks back, so I don’t know if any such offers are still in effect.

Oh, $500 and a taco!

Choose or lose…

Beaver Surprise! This Tourist Airplane Over San Francisco Used To Be a Part of CIA-Owned Air America, Inc.

Monday, December 16th, 2013

[TRIGGER WARNING: Beaver*]

This 1955 de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver, operated by Seaplane Adventures (aka San Francisco Seaplane Tours Inc) of Mill Valley, Marin County USA  and recently seen flying over Market Street…

…this one…

…used to operate out of Thailand as a part of the CIA-owned Air America, Inc a half-century ago.

See? It’s one of these:

“Six Beavers lined up* at Udorn, probably in 1962 (UTD/Fink/ photo no. 1-JF25-16-PB1)”

Get all the deets right here:

AIR AMERICA: DE HAVILLAND CANADA DHC-2 (L-20) BEAVER by Dr. Joe F. Leeker Last updated on 4 March 2013

To wit:

“DHC-2 (L-20) L-202 833 1 March 62 leased from US Army 54-1693

Service history: arrived at Bangkok in crates on 15 February 62, to be operated under the Madriver Contract AF62(531)-1674, based at Vientiane, but maintained at Udorn (Minutes ExCom-AACL of 23 January 62, in: UTD/CIA/B7F1); assembled by Thai Airways according to contract no. BKK 62-001 (Memorandum dated 9 February 62, in: UTD/Fink/B2F16); officially received at Bangkok on 1 March 62 (Aircraft list of June 62, corrected to Sept.1963, in: UTD/Kirkpatrick/B1F1).

Fate: was to be returned to the US Army in October 62 (Minutes ExCom-AACL of 30 October 62, in: UTD/CIA/B7F1); returned on 21 April 63 (Aircraft list of June 62, corrected to Sept.1963, in: UTD/Kirkpatrick/B1F1); sold to R. N. Nelson Earth Movers as N5220G in March 92; sold to Kenmore Air Harbor Inc, Kenmore, WA, in 92; sold to San Francisco Seaplane Tours, Mill Valley, CA, on 13 July 94; current in March 2004 (request submitted to the FAA on 13 March 2004 at http://162.58.35.241/acdatabase/); current in November 2008 (request submitted to the FAA on 23 Nov. 2008 at http://162.58.35.241/acdatabase/).”

So there you have it. Head on up to the Sausalito / Marin City / Mill Valley area and take a ride on a piece of flying history, if you want. $179 and up.

* Heh.

Just Announced: The Commonwealth Club’s Free “Syria Town Hall” – Tuesday September 10th, 2013 at 6:00PM

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Here it is, just announced by the Commonwealth Club:

Syria Town Hall

Image - Syria Town Hall
Tue, Sep 10 2013 – 6:00pm

Zubair Jandali, Member, Northern California Chapter, Syrian American Council; Head of Mobile App Developer Sales, Google; Graduate, UC Berkeley, B.S., Business Administration
Fred Lawson, Ph.D., Chair, Government Department, Mills College
Tareq Al Samman, Graphic Artist/Web Designer; Syrian activist
Kori Schake, Research Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University; Former Policy Expert, the Pentagon, U.S. State Department and National Security Council; Former Distinguished Chair in International Security Studies, West Point
Keith David Watenpaugh, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Modern Islam, Human Rights and Peace, and Director, Human Rights Initiative, UC Davis
Robert Rosenthal, Executive Director, Center for Investigative Reporting

The crisis in Syria has created global tension since the recent poison gas attack that killed some 1,400 people. How should the United States and other world leaders respond? Should the U.S. Congress grant President Obama “limited” authority to launch a military strike on Syria? Would a limited military intervention be effective or would it cause more problems than it solves? What would military intervention look like? Cruise missiles? Drones? What are the targets and what is the goal if not regime change? Would it deter Syrian President Bashar al-Assad from more attacks on civilians – or provoke him to launch more attacks? Would it trigger regional havoc in the Middle East possibly involving Iran, Israel, Lebanon and others? What are the repercussions if the U.S. does not strike? How might diplomacy and negotiation work to bring peace to the region?

Our panel of experts will address these questions in a FREE Town Hall Meeting.

Location: SF Club Office,595 Market Street, SF, CA
Time: 5:30 p.m. check-in, 6 p.m. program
Price: FREE
Also know: Photo by AslanMedia/Flickr. Program is In association with Middle East Member-Led Forum. Special thanks to Celia Menczel.

The Craziest Billboard Ever: “Visit Beautiful Island! Dodko, Korea!” – Insincerely Looming Over the I-80 in SoMA

Friday, August 30th, 2013

All right, here we go:

“The Liancourt Rocks … are a group of small islets in the Sea of Japan.”

Visiting these rocks for just 20 minutes, maximum, would involve a two lengthy flights* and then a 14-hour round-trip boat ride.

So this billboard, which is getting a lot of attention in South Korea, isn’t to promote tourism, it’s to promote politics:

Click to expand

So it’s just like this one** (that used to be near AT&T Park?) that was put up by a Yelp three-star dentist from San Jose, who*** probably charges too much money if he has the spare cash to produce ineffectual billboards like these.

Which is fair enough.

I s’pose.

Now the thing about the “East Sea” is that every sea is an east sea, right? So we should rename the Atlantic Ocean the East Ocean because that’s how it seems from our perspective? And without Japan, the Sea of Japan would just be the Pacific Ocean, right?

All right, I’ll just sit back and wait for the invasion of the Liancourt Rocks, which is never going to happen, but if it did, it would go a little something like this.

All the deets:

“The Liancourt Rocks, also known as Dokdo or Tokto (독도/獨島, literally “solitary island”) in Korean, and Takeshima (たけしま/竹島?, literally “bamboo island”) in Japanese,[1] are a group of small islets in the Sea of Japan.” 

* Crew Resource Management optional?

** Significant? No. Nobody cared about the World Baseball Classic, 90% of San Franciscans have no knowledge of it.

*** Am I supposed to know what “Top Best *8*” means? I don’t.

San Francisco Named Balboa Street to Honor a Man Famous for Killing LGBTs in Central America – Why Not Change It?

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Balboa Park, Balboa 31X, Balboa Street – there are lots of examples.

Now let’s check and see what Vasco Núñez de Balboa did to be so honored.

Oh, here it is:

Balboa setting his dogs upon Indian practitioners of male love (1594) The Spanish invader Vasco Núñez de Balboa (1475-1519) shown in Central America with his troops, presiding over the execution of Indians, whom he ordered eaten alive by the war dogs for having practiced male love. New York Public Library, Rare Book Room, De Bry Collection, New York.

Oh and we honor Funston too?

Oh well

 

San Francisco’s Most Anticipated Play of 2013: A.C.T.’s “Black Watch” – A Must-See – Runs Through June 16th

Friday, May 10th, 2013

This is it. This is your San Francisco Theatre Performance of the Year.

It’s Black Watch from Scotland.

It’s down in the Armory, in the Mission. If you show up late, they won’t let you in. 110 minutes, no intermission. And, oh yeah, all the tickets cost $100.

But everyone seems to love it. 

Get your tickets now if you want to go.

Look, it’s getting attention already:

Chad Jones of the San Francisco Chronicle

Karen D-Souza of the San Jose Mercury News

Georgia Rowe of the San Francisco Examiner

A shot from yesterday’s press preview at The Drill Court:

By  Brenden Mendoza – thanks!

All right, see you there!

Handy Guide: How to listen to Scootish People.

Here’s where it’s at:

The Armory Community Center
333 14th Street (between Mission and Valencia)
San Francisco, CA 94103

View a larger map and get directions

Use the Bay Area’s 511 TakeTransit Trip Planner to get public transit information.

For more information about public transportation and parking lot options please visit the Black Watch show page.

All the deets: 

National Theatre of Scotland’s Black Watch

May 9–June 16, 2013
A Revolutionary Theatrical Event

by Gregory Burke
Directed by John Tiffany

Performing in the Armory Community Center, located in San Francisco’s Mission District at 333 14th Street (between Mission and Valencia).

THERE WILL BE NO LATE SEATING!
Please plan appropriate travel time when making arrangements.

Running time:
1 hour and 50 minutes with no intermission

The internationally acclaimed hit—named “#1 Theatrical Event of the Year!”
by the New York Times
After transfixing audiences across the globe and receiving unanimous critical acclaim worldwide, National Theatre of Scotland’s revolutionary production of Black Watch makes its highly anticipated Bay Area premiere. Inspired by interviews with soldiers who served in Iraq with Scotland’s nearly 300-year-old Black Watch regiment, this hauntingly powerful depiction of war is so inventive and groundbreaking in scope that it demands a completely unique performance venue—and will take over the long-dormant Drill Court at San Francisco’s historic Mission Armory. Splicing together exquisitely deployed stagecraft, from choreographed marches and Scottish ballads to searing video news footage, Black Watch captures the layered state of being at war, from moment to gripping moment. A transformative theatrical event you don’t want to miss, Black Watch delivers a visceral, unforgettable experience.

Performances of Black Watch will take place in the Armory Community Center, located in San Francisco’s Mission District., located at 333 14th Street (between Mission and Valencia). Click here for directions.

“Thrilling . . . a necessary reminder of the transporting power that is unique to theater.” —The New York Times

“A genuine spectacle that revels in its own theatricality and comes replete with music, marching, explosive effects and its own piper.” —Chicago Tribune

“Magnificent” —New York Observer

“Enthralling” —Washington Post

“★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ! The world must see this play. Immediately.” —The Herald (Scotland)

“★ ★ ★ ★ ★! Fierce, passionate, and unguarded” —The Guardian

“A landmark event” —The Independent (London)

“A glorious piece of theater—raw, truthful, uncomfortable, moving, graceful and dynamic” —Scotland on Sunday

“Stirring and absorbing” —The West Australian

“A pulsating epic” —Daily Mail

San Francisco’s Connection to the North Korean Crisis: Pier 80, USS Tripoli, and THAAD Ballistic Missile Defense

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

1. Here’s the news of the day:

Anti-missile systems sent to Guam to counter North Korean threat

2. Those systems are called Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD).

3. THAAD was developed using the former USS Tripoli (LPH-10), an Iwo Jima-class amphibious assault ship that’s basically a mini aircraft carrier.

4. The USS Tripoli was based at Pier 80 in Dogpatch as recently as last year and it’s still there right now, for all I know.

That’s the connection.

That’s San Francisco’s contribution to the war effort.

(And, just saying, THAAD could come in handy when dealing with NK’s big buddy China…)

All the deets:

“She was decommissioned in 1995 and as of 2004, she was on loan to the Army, but remained laid up at Mare Island Naval Shipyard. In December 2006, the ship was towed to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, where it now has a high-tech role as a launch platform with the nation’s developing ballistic missile defense program. Three times the ship was towed some 100 miles off shore and used to launch small ballistic missiles, which are then intercepted by Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Missiles, test-fired from the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The last test in the series was performed 26 October, when the ship fired a “Scud-like” missile, which was successfully intercepted. The ship will be towed back to the San Francisco Bay Area for the winter. Kaua’i lacks a suitable land-based launch site, and the costs of building one would far exceed the approximately $600,000 per year it costs to use the old warship, so the vessel returned to Pearl Harbor for a second series of tests in late spring 2008.[1] As of 16 June 2012 she berthed at Pier 80 in San Francisco, CA.”

From 2008:

Well, look what just got towed in from Hawaii. Fresh from testing of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) system, San Francisco’s favorite former helicopter carrier, the former U.S.S. Tripoli (LPH-10), had its ups and downs in the Aloha State.

Read all about the post-retirement adventures of the USS Tripoli at Telstar Logistics.

Under the Golden Gate Bridge:

Who knows what the future will be for this old ship. Probably more missile launching.

And from 2010:

Now I could tell you all about the supr sekrt USS Tripoli (LPH-10 (Landing Platform, Helicopter)) but that would be MUY PRO HI BI DA DO (I say that in Spanish because that’s how not allowed it would be).

Suffice to say the old girl has been chilling in the Dogpatch lately, right next to ridiculously hilly Potrero Hill. See?

Click to expand

Where, oh where, will it get towed to next?

What, oh what, will it next launch into the Heav’ns Above?

Courage.

The Trip as seen off of Kauai in the 808 State (or somewhere else in the wide Pacific) during the sum, sum, summertime. Whoosh:

E komo mai. Nou ka hale, USS Tripoli

Occupy Oakland Update: Google Maps Now Shows Oakland’s Frank Ogawa Plaza as “Oscar Grant Plaza”

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

Editor Jon Brooks of News Fix, “KQED’s bay area news blog,” has this today:

So our morning anchor, Joshua Johnson, was doing a story on the Clorox earnings report, and in the process of finding exactly where their headquarters is located, came upon this:

Click to expand

Try it yourself – type “Oscar Grant” into Google Maps:

Oscar Grant Plaza, of course, is the name that the Occupy Wall Street people have given to their tent city location.

KQED has made a call down to Mountain View saying, “Hey Google, what’s the deal?”

We’ll see.

(I’m sure no one intended any dis for Frank H Ogawa.)

Great catch, Joshua Johnson.

Great post, Jon Brooks.

[UPDATE: Get more details right here. “NAParish” took steps to change the name back to Frank Ogawa Plaza at 8:44 AM this morning but that action is still pending. (It’s like a Wikipedia editing war. Remember those, back in the aughts? Just like with that tiresome “Violet Blue” woman - I guess you can do the same thing on Google Maps. See below.)

[UPDATE II: Oh no, now, per Google Maps, Frank Ogawa Plaza has two names. See?

I imagine that “Oscar Grant Plaza” won’t be on Google Maps at all in the very near future.]

[UPDATE III: And now it’s back to normal, back to plain old Frank H Ogawa Plaza. “Google Reviewer Sanjeevi” has, once again, put the big DENIED stamp on the idea of any political name-changing. Google’s “Local Names” feature is being abused no longer. Case Closed.]

“Negative note 38 mins 24 secs ago by NAParish
Reason: The edit could be misleading
This is not an “official” name, and this edit should have been denied. See commentary on previous edits.”
-
“Denied on Oct 31, 2011 7:39pm by NAParish
Reason: The edit could be misleading
There are two problems with this edit. One is that Google doesn’t seem to allow this type of political commentary by “renaming” an official feature. The name that some Occupy Oakland protesters are using doesn’t fit into any of the categories Google allows (Local is for the name in the local language, like using La Tour Eiffel as the “local” name for what speakers of English commonly call the Eiffel Tower). See http://goo.gl/gCf78 for the types of names that are allowed. The other problem is that the official name is Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, not just Frank Ogawa Plaza — and the official name should not have been removed a few edits back.”

Mark Your Calendars: Word on the Street is that the Next Big Iraq War Protest will be on Saturday, March 19th

Friday, February 11th, 2011

Brace yourselves:

Click to expand