Posts Tagged ‘wasteful’

Our Inefficient, Wasteful San Francisco Film Commission is Desperately Trying to Justify Itself – Potential Marketing Efforts

Friday, October 31st, 2014

These aren’t real ads, not yet. But they show you how the SFFC is thinking:

Capturegdfgd

(BTW, what the SFFC calls a “job” is what I’d call a gig, some of which are offered at less than minimum wage, just like the America’s Cup)

All film commissions are bad.

How is the SFFC better than any of the rest?

How is the SFFC better than SF’s recent hosting of the disastrous America’s Cup?

BTW, NBC’s Trauma medical drama was a big piece of shit, you know, frankly. Now people might say that I shouldn’t say that, but I don’t think they’d contradict me. Yes, the Trauma people spent some money and some people benefited, but there’s no reason why they should be treated any different than any other group of visitors coming to town. Anyway, Trauma sucked, big-time, despite what the SFFC people said about it. And part of the reason why it was cancelled had to do with how damn expensive it was to film on the Streets of San Francisco. So, what I’m saying is that maybe the whole concept of filming Trauma on location in SF was a bad idea – I’m certainly not saying we should have subsidized its production even more than we did.

And if Hollywood says it doesn’t want to come here to film, that’s O.K. Some productions, the ones that make sense, will come anyway.

Anywho, look for one of these feel-good banner ads to appear on your screens soon…

Fin.

The Wasteful, Unused, and Unnecessarily Long Driveway at 1124 Fulton near Alamo Square – It’s Huge!

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

I”m surprised that there isn’t like 15 cars parked on this thing 24-7:

Click to expand

This must be the biggest amount of unused space in the entire Western Addition.

Hooray?

If You Try to “Opt Out” of Useless Telephone Book Delivery, the Horrible YP Yellow Pages People Will Hound You

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013

In perpetuity.

Check it:

“A valid telephone number is required in order to process and verify opt-out requests. Incorrect or omitted information may prevent us from honoring your request.”

Why do they say they need your phone number? So they can ask you if you really, really think phonebooks are so useless these days that you don’t want them anymore.

And then, they’ll call you the next year and the next year and the next year. You know, to make sure. Again.

Forever.

So. which is worse? Would you rather get a useless phone book or a useless phone call?

Weeks after delivery, these books are still around:

Via Warzau Wynn – click to expand

YP Yellow Pages Local Search people, nobody in San Francisco wants what you’re selling.

Why don’t you go away?

Oh No, Once Again Telephone Book Season Comes to San Francisco! Dinosaur Industry Just Won’t Stop

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

I’m at a loss.

But I’ll tell you, if I see one of these paper monsters with “AT&T” on the cover, I’m going to deliver it back to the nearest AT&T store.*

Here’s what San Francisco telephone books look like before they get rained on: 

Via Warzau Wynn – click to expand

In closing, see you in Hell, telephone book industry!

*Unless you all “opt out” first! HAHAHAHA.

The Yellow Pages Opt-Out Program Simply Doesn’t Work – San Francisco Man Shows How Opt-In is Better than Opt-Out

Tuesday, December 6th, 2011

San Francisco resident Jon Sieker has a beef with AT&T.

See?

“You accidentally gave me a White and Yellow pages this year after I signed up to not receive either of them”

Here’s the proof:

Click to expand – via Jon Sieker

And here’s the note he just sent to Ma Bell, cause you see, Jon has Internet access:

“Dear AT&T,

2 years ago I was so disappointed by the waste that the Yellow and White pages caused, caring about my community and environment, I searched online for what I could do to minimize the waste. I was very happy to find your web site that allowed me to opt out and not receive a White Pages and Yellow pages to save on the waste. Thank you for providing this option as I have The Internet and don’t need a physical phone directory. The Internet gives me all of the information I need including your yellow pages site. I felt great to find and fill out the form that allowed me to NOT RECEIVE both yellow and white pages. I felt I was doing something to save the environment. Imagine my surprise when I was accidentally given both the yellow pages and white pages today.

Please let me know what I should do with the unwanted publications. It would be best if you came and picked them up from me and passed them on to some unfortunate soul with no internet.

As a side not, it would be great if your delivery agents didn’t litter my street and community with these unwanted relics from the past. I have photos of the litter if you are interested or don’t believe me. I would be happy to pass these photos on to you or any of the other organizations copied on this email.

Thank you for your help. I look forward to the solution you provide.”

O.K. then.

Now, do you think that the National Opt Out Program would work any better?

I don’t.

Simply, nobody in San Francisco wants telephone books anymore.

So, telephone book industry, why not just tell your Santas to pass over the 415 when you send them out delivering across America this holiday season?

Just asking…

Dear Telephone Book Industry: Nobody in San Francisco Wants Your Product – Opt In Beats Opt Out

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

Uh, telephone book industry, what you don’t seem to realize is that the vast majority of your “customers” in the 415 don’t want your product.

That’s why when you deliver them, they end up hanging around exactly where you left them for days or weeks…

…or months. See?

The only people who like telephone books in the bay area are the people who make (not very much) money delivering them:

Now, telephone book industry, wouldn’t you prefer it if your customers actually wanted your product? That’s how opt-in works.

I know you all talk about  opt-out, but what I don’t think you all realize is that most of the books you deliver go into the recycling without ever being opened. (This might not be applicable in Omaha, Neb., but it’s certainly true in the 415.)

And I know the bidnesses what advertise in your books are reassured by all the hullabaloo of delivery, but you’d be better off just delivering your product directly to recycling bins and, letting your true customers just dig them out, you know, if they want.

All right, see you Hell, dinosaur telephone book industry!

Telephone Book Industry Group Changes Name: From “Yellow Pages Assn.” to “Local Search Assn.” – Heh

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

Now whatever you do, never “opt out” of useless telephone book delivery. (“It’s a trap!”)

‘Cause that’s just what they want you to do. (Just like ShoppyBag, that scam, which wants you to “opt out” – it wants you to do anything with it except ignore it, which is what everybody should do and then the scam would simply go away. )

No no, just wait for Nature to take its course, just wait for San Francisco’s “opt-in” law to take effect. Easy peasy.

Now check it, Rachel Gordon’s bit today shows us the new name of the phone book industry’s horrible, wasteful, useless, trade group. See? It’s now called the “LOCALSEARCH ASSOCIATION.”

Isn’t that cute? This lobbying group thinks its Google!

(You know, back in the day the buggy whip industry should have changed its product’s name to “horse throttle,” right? The better to compete with the nascent vehicular competition…)

That’s it, keep on making us laugh, Yellow Pages Association.

Jerry Brown Kicks Ass: Wants to Kill Redevelopment Agencies, But San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee Says No

Sunday, February 20th, 2011

Governor Jerry Brown has arrived in 2011 taking names and kicking ass, más o menos. His latest target is on California’s wasteful Redevelopment Agencies – he wants to kill them dead, fair ‘nough.

But here comes the blowback, from, among others, San Francisco Mayor Edwin Lee. Deets below.

Automatic for the People: No private jet for Jer-Bear, oh no. He flies the Southwest Airlines:

Jan Sturmann

(And are you aware of the phrase “Big 10 California cities?” Are they like an entity or something? Is it like, “Step away, Bakersfield and Riverside! You gots to add 20k more people before you can join Anaheim and all the rest of us in the Big Ten?”)

You sort of got to figure that if JB wanted to propose something like Ed Lee’s idea, JB already would have done just that, right? Or maybe JB is just too stupid to figure things out?

And isn’t the City and County of San Francisco free to fund whatever corporate welfare it wants on its own?

And does any politician anywhere really “create jobs?” IRL?

Anyway, all the deets:

“MAYOR EDWIN LEE TO TRAVEL TO SACRAMENTO TO SUPPORT ALTERNATIVE PROPOSAL TO GOVERNOR’S PLAN TO ELIMINATE LOCAL REDEVELOPMENT AGENCIES

San Francisco, CA – Mayor Edwin M. Lee today announced he will travel to Sacramento later this week to support an alternative to the proposed elimination of Redevelopment Agencies in response to Governor Jerry Brown’s request for revenue and reform ideas that would generate $1.7 billion in savings. Over the past several weeks, mayors have developed a viable alternative to eliminating Redevelopment Agencies that creates an ongoing revenue stream and will reform and right-size redevelopment agencies, while preserving this important tool for creating jobs and housing for California’s future.

“Redevelopment has been used as a critical tool by cities like San Francisco to transform neighborhoods, create jobs, and spur economic growth,” said Mayor Lee. “The alternative proposal addresses Governor Brown’s call for revenue and reform ideas as the State faces difficult budget challenges and would allow cities to continue to wisely use redevelopment dollars to leverage private dollars to revitalize communities, create local jobs, and stimulate the local economy.”

The alternative proposal Mayor Lee supports would provide:

· State Budget Funding: Starting in July, redevelopment agencies will transfer 5% of their property tax funding to the State on an annual basis. This will generate over $200 million each year to support over $1.7 billion in special bonds, meeting the Governor’s plan to generate $1.7 billion in 2011-12 funding from agencies.

· Enhanced Local Revenue Sharing: Redevelopment agencies will dramatically increase the share of property taxes which “pass-through” counties, schools, and other taxing entities. Starting in 2018, 40% of agency property tax increment will return to counties and schools, 20% will be used for affordable housing development, and 40% will be used for economic development activities, including investment in infrastructure and public improvements which support critical job-generating development.

· Structural Reforms: Cities will be limited in the amount of property that can be placed into redevelopment areas, and enhanced public information and hearing requirements will be put in place to ensure that all major investments are fully reviewed by the public. Restrictions will be tightened on the use of affordable housing funds, to ensure that these monies are used to meet pressing community needs.

This proposal comes on the heels of an independent analysis completed at the request of the Big 10 California cities that shows there is 50% of the $1.7 billion estimated by the State Department of Finance as available in the current fiscal year from the state’s redevelopment agencies.

In San Francisco, the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency (SFRA) has been instrumental in helping to revitalize communities, create jobs and generate tax revenues. SFRA has been integral to the growth and economic development of San Francisco over the past 62 years. Successful completed redevelopment projects include the Embarcadero Center and Golden Gateway complex, Hunters Point Hill, Yerba Buena Center, the Giants AT&T Ballpark, and the development of over 10,000 units of affordable housing. Current efforts include large-scale master-planned developments in Mission Bay, Treasure Island and Hunters Point Shipyard, neighborhood revitalization in the Bayview and South of Market, funding for the reconstruction of the Transbay Terminal, and the rebuilding of some of the City’s most dilapidated public housing projects.

San Francisco focused public investment in the City’s emerging neighborhoods is leveraging private investment to create new industries, jobs, and housing. In Mission Bay, the redevelopment of this former railyard has already created over 3,100 new homes (674 affordable) and 1.7 million square feet of office and biotechnology space centered around the UCSF research campus. SFRA’s investment of $110 million in public redevelopment financing for infrastructure to date has leveraged over $2.0 billion in private development and created over 10,000 permanent new jobs. Without continued redevelopment financing of infrastructure, the remaining 2,900 units of housing, (including more than 1,100 additional affordable units to be financed with tax increment), 2.7 million square feet of commercial development, and completed infrastructure for the UCSF Medical Center will be jeopardized, along with 20,000 additional permanent jobs.”