Posts Tagged ‘whales’

Berkeley Pedestrian Bridge Over the I-80 Reads as You Might Expect: “US NAVY – STOP KILLING WHALES”

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017

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Vessel vs. Humpback Whale Collisions Must Have Occurred Daily During Sardine Seasons 2016 & 2017 – Is There Anything To Be Done?

Wednesday, October 4th, 2017

IDK.

But man, there’s just so much traffic (whales, boats,kite boarders, tankers, container ships, barges, etc.) under and near our Golden Gate Bridge that collisions are inevitable.

This captain was trolling for whale, for example, just this past summer:

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This fishing balena is going to pop up somewhere, so let’s circle around until that happens:

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And on:

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And on:

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Anyway, JMO

Photos of Our Humpback Whale Season 2017: The Views that You Can Have from the Golden Gate Bridge

Monday, August 7th, 2017

As preschool season begins, whale season ends, for me anyway. But I’ve heard reports from just a few days ago, so you might still be able to see some.

Sometimes you can be on the bridge and see absolutely nothing, even during the middle of an epic season like 2017. But other times, you could see many whales, perhaps a dozen and a half at one time, on both sides of the bridge.

I’ve never seen them “spyglassing” or breeching, but apparently others have from the GGB. Maybe next year for me.

From the west side sidewalk, South (aka PGE) Tower:

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And without the scribbling:

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You’d also see them near Alcatraz, Angel Island, Horseshoe Bay, and Crissy Field, in addition to the entire part of the Golden Gate on the west side of the bridge.

But the best view is when you’re looking down on them when they are very close to the towers.

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Fire Boat vs. Humpback: SFFD Slows and Stops to Avoid Striking a Whale Beneath the Golden Gate Bridge

Monday, July 17th, 2017

This was yesterday:

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With the whale down again, the San Francisco Fire Department boat then puttered away.

We’ve had a lot of documented whale strikes lately, but this is the most care I’ve seen displayed by a boating crew.

Frisco Boats vs. Frisco Whales – How Close is Too Close? – “iSailboat” Bears Down on Diving Humpback

Thursday, July 6th, 2017

IDK the answer to this question.

This is prolly the closest I saw the past week or so. A large Beneteau 40 sailboat (named iSailboat, worth what, a couple hundred thou?) east of the Golden Gate Bridge was just seconds away from having its hull or keel hitting this humpback:

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You know, IMO.

Other recent examples:

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Not real sailing here, just puttering around with the whales for a while.

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Anyway, just saying.

Mother Whales and Baby Whales, ‘Neath the Golden Gate Bridge

Wednesday, July 5th, 2017

IDK if Golden Gate Humpback Whale Season 2017 is over already, but man, I’ve never seen so many whales in Frisco waters as I’ve seen the past week.

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And this was from farther away. I was thinking that maybe this mama whale had a chunk taken out of it by a killer whale but now I’m thinking this is prolly just an optical delusion, so these could be the very same animules as above.

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Whale Fever, Catch It!

Boat-Damaged Humpback Whale, Golden Gate

Monday, July 3rd, 2017

As seen from the Golden Gate Bridge.

None of the others looked like this, AFAICS.

The lines running from lower left to upper right:

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Boat vs. whale has been in the news lately…

OMG, Your Best Way to Spend $125: 2012 Farallon Island Whale Watching Season Starts May 26th!

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

Check it, our very own Oceanic Society is kicking off annual Farallon Island whale watching season on May 26, 2012.

All the deets:

WHALE WATCH/NATURE CRUISES TO FARALLON ISLANDS BEGIN MAY 26 
 
San Francisco, California – Oceanic Society’s educational day long boat trips to the Farallon Islands, just 27 miles west of San Francisco, will operate May 26 through November 25, with departures available from San Francisco and Sausalito. 
 
Blue whales (the largest animal to have ever lived on earth), Humpback whales, Pacific white-sided dolphins, Harbor porpoises, Risso’s dolphins and Northern right whale dolphins all may be encountered during the whale-watch cruises to the islands and the nearby continental shelf. 
 
An exceptional wilderness area, the Farallon Islands National Wildlife Refuge is the largest seabird rookery in the eastern Pacific south of Alaska – including nesting Tufted puffins, Pigeon guillemots, Rhinoceros auklets, Common murres, Black oystercatchers and cormorants. The Islands are also a breeding haven and home to California sea lions, northern elephant seals, Steller sea lions, Harbor seals and fur seals. 
 
Though only scientists are permitted on the islands, the abundance of wildlife may be closely observed and photographed from aboard the Salty Lady, Oceanic Society’s 56-foot, Coast Guard-certified vessel. The boat holds 48 passengers. 
 
Experienced naturalists lead each excursion to help identify seabirds and locate whales and interpret their behavior. The naturalists also provide informal discussions on marine wildlife and on the history of the islands. Passengers also benefit from the presence of whale researchers from the Cascadia Research Collective, scientists who have studied these whales since the early 1990’s. 
 
Oceanic Society trips to the Farallon Islands depart Saturdays, Sundays and select Fridays from the Marina Green in San Francisco. Trips begin at 8 a.m. and last about eight hours.  Passengers also have the option of departing at 7:15 a.m. from the Sausalito Clipper Yacht Harbor. The minimum age is 10, and an adult must accompany children under 15.  Participants supply their own food and beverages. 
 
The fee is $125 per person, with special group rates available. The fee includes a copy of “The Farallon Islands: Past, Present, and Future,” a 42-minute DVD produced by the Oceanic Society in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The DVD offers a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the natural and human history of the Farallon Islands and provides a virtual land tour of the islands. (Additional DVDs cost $15.)
 
Founded in 1969, the mission of the Oceanic Society is to protect marine wildlife and oceanic biodiversity through an integrated program of scientific research and environmental education. An official partner of the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge, Oceanic Society has offered educational whale-watch cruises since 1984 and is the only nonprofit organization that offers whale-watch trips year round in the Bay Area. 
 
Reservations for the Farallon Islands whale-watch trips are advised. Please call 415- 256-9941 or 800-326-7491 or register atwww.oceanicsociety.org. For recorded information on current wildlife sightings, call 415-258-8220.

Sea you there!

The Humpback Whales of San Francisco County – Meet Mama, Papa and Junior – But Ouch: Big Killer Whale Bite

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

All right, I need to payoff on that headline.

Here are your humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) of San Francisco County, which, of course, includes a whole bunch of ocean (depending on how you look at it.)

A pair of namesake humps. This particular species is not endangered at all – there are tons of them out there.

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Horizontal tale = whale, of course. These things are huge, like almost 50 feet long and weighing as much as older DC-9 jetliners:

Here’s Mama and Papa and Junior, just a pod of freelance whales coming and going as they please:

And here’s what happens when a killer whale takes a big bite out of your hump. Chomp chomp:

Bon courage, cetaceans!

The Happy Sea Lions of the Farallon Islands – All Playing Together with Whales

Monday, September 20th, 2010

This is the scene from five miles west of the Farallones.

Get the story of the whales right here.

Click to expand:

Via (nz)dave