Posts Tagged ‘wildlife’

San Francisco Opposes the Feds Killing Off Mice on the Farallon Islands? Fear of Dead Seagulls Scaring Tourists?

Thursday, December 11th, 2014

Well, this is news to me.

All the Feds want to do is kill off the mice of the Farallones and San Francisco is standing in the way?

Check out how our Federales scored a “rip-roaring conservation success” exterminating vermin up in Alaska at Hawadex Island, which was known for centuries as “Rat Island.”

I’ll tell you, I can’t name any of the “visionary policies and innovative programs” created by SF Environment that Director Deborah Raphael boasts of.

Can you, Gentle Reader?

One down, a million to go – here’s the big version, via nature photographer Jenny Erbes.

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The “World’s Most Rodent-Packed Island” is in San Francisco – When Will We Let the Feds Kill the Mice on South Farallon?

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

Here we go, from the USA Today from a few months back:

“Those suffering from musophobia would be wise to steer clear of the South Farallon Islands. The archipelago, which sits just 27 miles off San Francisco, is the most rodent-dense island in the world, with an average of 500 Eurasian house mice occupying each of its 120 acres (that’s 60,000 total).”

Now I’ll tell you, I have had it with these motherfucking mice on this motherfucking island.

So why don’t we finally get rid of them, like this:

South Farallon Islands Invasive House Mouse Eradication Project: Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement

(That’s posted on a either pro-mouse or anti-mouse website – I just can’t tell and don’t really care.)

A few years back, up in Alaska, the Feds killed off all the rats on Rat Island in the Rat Island Group:

THE RAT ISLAND RAT ERADICATION PROJECT: A CRITICAL EVALUATION OF NONTARGET MORTALITY - Final report issued December 2010

See? That was a huge success. Now the chopper pilots were nervous up there ’cause a big storm was coming so they wanted to bug out of there with a quickness so they didn’t follow their marching orders very well so more bald eagles died than was necessary. But they killed all the rats on Rat Island, hurray!

All we need to do is nothing. Then the feds can get off their asses and start killing all the mice.

“More study” is NOT needed.

That’s your update.

A relatively fog-free day in the Sunset District.

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Through the tinted glass of the ginourmous windows of Yelp-rated Sava Pool

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From a higher sperspective in the Twin Peaks area, on an exceptionally clear morning.

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Can you see the lighthouse on the top of South East Farallon Island?

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Noisy Canon 10D at 840mm, from Christmas Tree Point Road, a skosh more than 30 miles away…

Nature in the City by Fred Sharples: The Dead Street Rats of Bernal Heights

Monday, April 9th, 2012

Just as Richmond District residents can get to see wild animals in the City, Bernal Heightsians too can stroll and observe.

Ladies and Gentleman, as promised, a genuine Bernal Heights Street Rat:

Via area entrepreneur Fred Sharples – click to expand

Bernal Heights black rats, Bernal Heights brown rats, and others. Collect them all!

The Feds Don’t Know Jack About Solyndra or the Central Subway, But They DO Know How to Kill Mice on the Farallones

Monday, October 17th, 2011

Obviously, non-targeted species will be affected when the Feds airbomb the Farallon Islands with rodenticide to kill all those mice.

Like this one. See it? Here’s the big version, via nature photographer Jenny Erbes.

But so what. What’s the deal?

This is one of the things that the feds do right.

Like, they were so effective up north not too long ago that Rat Island will need a new name after 229 years.

So, hurry up Feds, we’re waiting on you…

Alaska’s Rat Island is Free of Rats after 229 Years, So Why Can’t Our Farallon Islands be Free of Rodents as Well?

Wednesday, May 18th, 2011

You see, the Feds had a plan to kill the famous rats of Rat Island, Alaska and they did that, with extreme prejudice, just a few years back.

See? No more Japanese rats from that shipwreck of the 18th century:

Click to expand

So why can’t the Feds do the same thing with our Farallon Islands?

Get cracking, Feds.

Oh Marin, You So Crazy (OMYSC)! Saving the Non-Native, Bird-Killing Siberian House Mice of the Farallon Islands

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

You know, one of these days, I’ll start a half-assed non-profit, pay myself a six-figure salary, put the wife on staff, hire the kids too, put cute animal pictures on the homepage to keep the cash coming in – whew, good times.

Anyway, unrelated to that, srsly, comes now WildCare Bay Area to object to the Feds’ plans to airdrop a couple tons of poison on the Farallones (or Farallon Islands, (Spanish for pillars or “rocky outcrop,” see comments)) to kill the thousands of resident, non-native house mice what eat the eggs of endangered native birds.

Like this one. See it? Here’s the big version, via nature photographer Jenny Erbes.

Via Los Farallones

All right, enough of Marin, let’s hear from the people on the scene:

Dec 31, 2010
In general, however, it is known that owls are an opportunistic eater, feasting on the introduced house mice, but also preying upon songbirds, small seabirds (such as the ashy storm-petrel), beetles, and other terrestrial invertebrates …

May 25, 2010
While they rate very high on the cuteness quotient, overwintering Burrowing Owls are major predators of storm petrels during the spring, after abundant housemice have their seasonal population crash. Western Gulls also take many storm …
Feb 19, 2007
In 1969, south farallon was declared a national wildlife refuge. the lighthouse was automated in 1972, ending 117 years of continuous occupation. the last rabbit and cat were removed from the islands in 1974…

In closing, Marin, You So Crazy!

A relatively fog-free day in the Sunset District.

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Through the tinted glass of the ginourmous windows of Yelp-rated Sava Pool

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From a higher sperspective in the Twin Peaks area, on an exceptionally clear morning.

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Can you see the lighthouse on the top of South East Farallon Island?

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Noisy Canon 10D at 840mm, from Christmas Tree Point Road, a skosh more than 30 miles away…

Come See the “Presidio Habitats” Art Exhibition Plus the New Presidio Park Trail

Monday, July 26th, 2010

Have you seen Presidio Habitats,” the Site-Based Art Exhibition Celebrating Presidio Nature and Wildlife? Well, then get up there, it’s ending May 15, 2011.

Bring your walking shoes and then make the Triskelion (srsly, that’s what they call it) pavilion at Fort Winfield Scott your starting point.

Forty-foot shipping containers never looked so good:

Click to expand

Here it is from the outside:

And here’s the starting gate of Presidio Habitats:

Something to do with bunnnies and turtles, take a look:

O.K. then. Here’s Patience by Jensen Architects. or part of it anyway:

The mise-en-scene:

Western Screech Owl Habitats by Ai Weiwei:

A 600mm shot shows that these porcelain palaces are move-in ready:

Winged Wisdom by Phillippe Becker Design / Brody Hartman:

A closer view:

Sculpture Habitat for the Gray Fox by CEBRA

Owl Dome by Taalman Koch Architecture:

That’s just a taste. The whole point is that you’re supposed to get out there and go see everything for yourself. The more the merrier.

As these people realized on Saturday, walking along the new/improved Park Trail. (Learn more about the changes to this trail after the jump.)

The entire place is one giant art gallery but without the white wine.

And, oh yes, here’s one concept that didn’t make it. I guess you’d need to suppose that a bird made a nest and laid eggs in a golf cart and then somebody hoisted it into the air. Anyway, here’s the Photoshopped proposal: 

(This installation might serve to hack off the golfers of the Presidio, I don’t know…)

There you have it. Here are some upcoming events for PH and you can find the deets of the Park Trail after the jump.

Exhibition Pavilion and Self-Guided Tours
The starting point for the Presidio Habitatsexperience is an indoor exhibition space created from repurposed shipping containers. Here visitors can view all 25 proposals submitted for the exhibition, scale models, and other artist material, as well as video about the Presidio’s plants and wildlife. An Exhibition Mapwill lead you on a self-guided journey encompassing all installation sites. The Exhibition Pavilion hours through October 31, 2010: 11 am – 5 pm, Wednesday-Sunday. It is located at the corner of Storey Avenue and Ralston Avenue in the Fort Scott District.

Log Cabin Series
The Presidio Trust presents a year-long series of talks, multimedia presentations, and performances at the historic Log Cabin. Inspired by the Presidio, its wildlife, and Habitats art, the Log Cabin Series will host events on the second Thursday of each month. The Exhibition Pavilion will be open until 7 pm on these evenings.

Animal Estates and Edible Estates: An Evening with Fritz Haeg
Thursday, June 10, 7–8:30 pm
Author, designer, and artist Fritz Haeg created Snag Tower, a vertical dwelling for native species and currently an installation of Presidio Habitats. Learn about his project Animal Estates, proposing the re-introduction of native animals into cities, and his book Edible Estates: Attack on the Front Lawn.

Triskelion: The Story of the Presidio Habitats Exhibition Pavilion
Thursday, July 8, 7–8 pm

San Francisco Architects Zoe Prillinger and Luke Ogrydziak, known for their progressive, modern designs that include new media technologies, discuss their creation of the Presidio HabitatsExhibit Pavilion from repurposed shipping containers arranged at 120 degree angles around a central atrium.

The Birds and the Bees: A Presidio Experience
Thursday, August 12, 7–8 pm

About 200 bird species and 57 bee species buzz and fly through the Presidio. Gain a new perspective on the different shapes and sizes of wildlife homes within the Presidio from Presidio Trust natural resource experts.

The Art of Patience: Meet Architect Mark Jensen
Thursday, September 9, 7–8 pm
Architect Mark Jensen will discuss his Habitats installation Patience, featuring dramatically austere yellow chairs that afford visitors a unique perspective on the Presidio’s Great Blue Herons.

Family Program: Create with Nature
Saturday, June 12, 10 am to 2 pm
Saturday, August 7, 10 am to 2 pm

Kids and grown-ups alike will get creative with natural materials in an outdoor Presidio setting. The ingredients for the day include wood, leaves, stone, pine cones, bark, branches, water, and imagination. Bring a picnic lunch or snack. Meet at the Exhibition Pavilion.

Guided Adventures
Presidio staff, friends, and FOR-SITE Foundation representatives will lead visitors on guided walks. Meet at the Exhibition Pavilion. RSVP is required to (415) 561-5418 or presidio@presidiotrust.gov.

Presidio Butterflies 101 Walk
RSVP to (415) 561-5418 or presidio@presidiotrust.gov
Sunday, July 18, 10 am to Noon
Sunday, August 29, 10 am to Noon

Presidio Habitats Curatorial Walk
RSVP to (415) 561-5418 or presidio@presidiotrust.gov
Saturday, July 24, 10 am to Noon
Saturday, August 7, 10 am to Noon

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From the Cal Academy, Farallon Island Wildlife Webcam Kicks Off June 8

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2009

Mark your calendar and get your popcorn – soon you’ll be able  while away those lazy afternoons at work glued to the images you’ll see from the “FIRST EVER WEBCAM TO STREAM LIVE FOOTAGE FROM THE FARALLON NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE.”

“Just in time for the first annual World Oceans Day, the first ever webcam on the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge will go live on June 8 at http://www.calacademy.org/webcams/farallones/ Powered by solar energy and perched on a windswept lighthouse on top of Southeast Farallon Island, the webcam will provide an unprecedented view of the seabirds, seals, and possibly even sharks that call these isolated islands home.

“The live webcam feed will be accompanied by animal identification guides, Farallones history, and research and conservation information. This exciting new initiative is made possible through a cooperative partnership between the California Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science.”

It’s going to be mega.

See all them sharks and boids? Well, maybe not, but this is a relatively fog-free day in the Sunset District. Until the new webcam came along, this was as close as you could could get to the Farallones.

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Through the tinted glass of the ginourmous windows of Yelp-rated Sava Pool

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From a higher perspective in the Twin Peaks area, on an exceptionally clear morning.

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Can you see the lighthouse on the top of South East Farallon Island? That’s the site of the new webcam:

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Noisy Canon 10D at 840mm, from Christmas Tree Point Road, a skosh more than 30 miles away

That will have to do you until Monday.

Remember their promise: “possibly even sharks.”

FIRST EVER WEBCAM TO STREAM LIVE FOOTAGE FROM THE FARALLON NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE
Cooperative partnership between California Academy of Sciences, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science allows Web users to follow the action on the largest seabird colony in the continental United States

SAN FRANCISCO (May 27, 2009) – Just in time for the first annual World Oceans Day, the first ever webcam on the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge will go live on June 8 at www.calacademy.org/webcams/farallones. Powered by solar energy and perched on a windswept lighthouse on top of Southeast Farallon Island, the webcam will provide an unprecedented view of the seabirds, seals, and possibly even sharks that call these isolated islands home. The live webcam feed will be accompanied by animal identification guides, Farallones history, and research and conservation information. This exciting new initiative is made possible through a cooperative partnership between the California Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and PRBO Conservation Science.

Located 27 miles west of San Francisco, the Farallon National Wildlife Refuge is composed of three island groups that are home to the largest seabird colony in the continental United States. Approximately 250,000 seabirds representing 13 species and five species of seals and sea lions use the islands. Gray whales, blue whales, and humpback whales migrate past the islands every year. The area is also an important feeding ground for great white sharks. The refuge was established in 1909 by President Theodore Roosevelt as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds.

More deets after the jump.

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