Posts Tagged ‘wooden’

Word on the Street, Hayes Street Edition: THINK THAT YOU MIGHT BE WRONG

Monday, December 8th, 2014

As seen from the sidewalk on Hayes Street:

P1170439 copy

Click to expand

Word on the Street: Instead of Fillmore, “Fill-No-More”

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

As seen on Fillmore Street in the Fillmore, home of the failed Fillmore Jazz District, brought to you by our horrible, failed Redevelopment Agency and SPUR, the urban renewal people:

On it goes…

Oh, here’s my message to those SPUR people:

Instead of doing something, just stand there.

The Classiest Port-A-Potty You’ll Ever See – Who’ll Want to Reclaim This Wood? – Down and Out in Presidio Heights

Monday, April 28th, 2014

The Timeless Question of Where to Carry Your SFPD-Issued Nightstick / Attitude Adjuster – Oh, Here’s a Good Place!

Monday, February 3rd, 2014

How about in a tube above the front wheel, within easy reach of your right hand?

Click to expand

So many perpetrators, so little time…

Back in the Day, Fire Escapes / Wooden Decks Like These Would Collapse a Lot – But Not Anymore

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

For some reason.

A couple decades back, people at house parties would overload these decks and then come crashing down, due to dry rot people would say.

I suppose SFGov is doing a better job regulating things nowadays.

An Oakland Burglary Story Told with One Photo – Via Peter Hartlaub – Wood is Good But Steel is Real

Wednesday, June 12th, 2013

A pithy question:

“Think barring your doors with 2x4s will keep your stuff safe in Oakland?”

Click to expand

$3200 Crib Set Rendered Unsellable by the Feds – Can You Sell Drop Side Cribs on Craigslist Anymore? No, Hell No

Friday, April 26th, 2013

Here you go, here’s an expensive crib set what includes a crib with a drop side (which means it slides up and down) which you can’t sell in the United States anymore.

But can you sell it used on Craigslist? No. Hell no.

Check it, straight from the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Loophole alert: Are you allowed to sell this crib not as a crib but as a convertible child’s bed?

Possibly.

Loophole alert: Are you allowed to throw away the drop side and sell the crib as a daybed, thusly?

“Beautiful, high quality solid wood Morigeau-Lepine crib converted to toddler day bed. Originally purchased for 850.00. Attached picture is of original drop-side crib which is now banned in the U.S. Drop side piece is not included in this sale to avoid possible danger.”

I don’t know. Maybe.

But what I do know is that you can’t sell drop side cribs no mo, even  on Craigslist.

And yet people try to do that on Craigslist each and every day.

Just saying, ma’am.

What should you buy instead? How about a Sniglar* from IKEA? It costs just $69 (and it certainly looks like it costs just $69.)

And it will not impress any rich ladies in Russian Hill or anywhere else.

But, the Sniglar, she is legal, and that’s the thing.

Sorry for the hassle. Thank you, drive through.

“Morigeau Lepine (Canadian) WOODEN CRIB SET: $3250 VALUE — selling for $1000

Gorgeous Morigeau Lepine furniture in excellent condition. 2800 series collection. Used by one child only in smoke-free house. Can purchase individual pieces or all. Morigeau Lepine furniture is quality, Canadian crafted. Smooth to the touch, durable hardwood construction. It will stand the test of time and you will likely be able to pass down to others. All pieces match and are white with espresso (dark wood) detailing — SEE PHOTOS. 
Crib – $550. Converts to a full-sized bed when child grows older! (Crib mattress can be added for additional $50)
Dresser – $300 
Bookshelf – $200 
$1,000 for all three”

*Wasn’t that Gollum’s name back when he was a Hobbit? Something like that.

(more…)

Photos from Asian Art Museum’s “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection” – Opens June 2013

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Here’s the big news from Kenneth Baker yesterday.

More deets:

“Called “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection,” the exhibit will include works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573—1615) and Edo (1615—1868) periods along a 13th—14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.”

This should be an excellent show.

All photos courtesy of the Asian Art Museum:

Shotoku Taishi as an Infant, Unknown, Kamakura period (1249-1335). Wood with polychromy. Larry Ellison Collection

Tigers (detail), 1779. By Maruyama Okyo (Japanese, 1733-1795). One of a pair of hanging scrolls; ink and light colors on paper. Larry Ellison Collection.

Auspicious Pine, Bamboo, Plum, Crane and Turtles, Edo period (1615-1868),ca. 1630-1650. By Kano Sansetsu (Japanese, 1590-1651,By Sansetsu, Kano 1590-1651. One of a pair of six panel folding screens. Ink and colors on gold. Larry Ellison Collection

Oh, and don’t forget about Korean Culture Day this Sunday, September 23, 2012. It’s free!

“IN THE MOMENT: JAPANESE ART FROM THE LARRY ELLISON COLLECTION
Asian Art Museum debuts Ellison’s Japanese art collection, coinciding with 2013 America’s Cup

SAN FRANCISCO, September 20, 2012—Next summer, as the America’s Cup Challenger Series takes to San Francisco Bay, the Asian Art Museum will feature an exhibition of Japanese art from the rarely seen collection of Larry Ellison, Oracle CEO and owner of ORACLE TEAM USA, defender of the 2013 America’s Cup.

In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection will introduce approximately 80 exceptional artworks spanning 1,300 years. The exhibition explores the dynamic nature of art selection and display in traditional Japanese settings, where artworks are often temporarily presented in response to a special occasion or to reflect the change of seasons. In the Moment also considers Mr. Ellison’s active involvement in displaying art in his Japanese-style home, shedding light on his appreciation for Japan’s art and culture.

Included in the exhibition are significant works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573–1615) and Edo (1615–1868) periods along with other important examples of religious art, lacquer, woodwork, and metalwork. Highlights include a 13th–14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.

“This exhibition offers a rare glimpse of an extraordinary collection,” said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. “We aim to present it in a fresh and original way that explores traditional Japanese principles governing the relationship of art to our surroundings and social relationships.”

The exhibition is organized by the Asian Art Museum and curated by Dr. Laura Allen, the museum’s curator of Japanese art, and Melissa Rinne, associate curator of Japanese art, in consultation with Mr. Ellison’s curator, Dr. Emily Sano.

The exhibition is on view June 28, 2013 through September 22, 2013. The Asian Art Museum will serve as the only venue for the exhibition.

For more information visit: www.asianart.org

Giant, Inchoate, Golden Gate Park Panhandle Tree Swing – What’s It For? Who Did This?

Monday, June 25th, 2012

How long are these ropes? Like 50 feet each?

South of NoPA and west of EaPA and North of SoPA:

Click to expand

What’s the game? Do you climb up this huge tree and then slither down the ropes and then tie on a board and then start swinging?

Boy, I’d like to see that…

You Can Do/ Anything

Gumps in Union Square is Already All Ready for Christmas 2011 – Everything’s Eurocentric, Except for Buddha-Claus

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2011

As seen from Post Street.

Don’t miss the giant Buddha* – he’s in the mix as well:

Click to expand

Merry Christmas!

* Now, you think, and I’m srsly you guys, you think maybe at some point Gumps could make a replica of the Buddha and then send the original back to Northern China whence it came? Just asking, Gump-bro. I know you have custody of it currently, from Agents of Fortune, though Accident of History, but is that the way it will always be? 

“A Qing Dynasty gilded wood Buddha, carved for a summer palace in Northern China, is located in the store. It was carved in the Northern Manchurian Province of Jehol, the summer capital of the Ch’ing Emperors in the early 19th Century. The piece, the largest of its kind outside a museum, is the only item in the store that is not for sale.”

China, China, calling out to history
Is that the way it will always be?