Posts Tagged ‘works’

Here’s What You Need: An Electric-Assist Cargo Bike from NTS Works of Santa Cruz – But a Bit Pricey at $4800

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

I don’t know, man, but here’s your 68-pound, $4800 cargo bike from NTS Works:

Click to expand

It’s new, it’s you, maybe.

All the deets of today’s debut:

“Introducing NTS Works’ electric 2×4 Cargo Bike

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 4, 2013

What:
It rides like a bicycle and works like a pick-up truck. The revolutionary electric 2×4 Cargo Bike is using patent-pending technology to deliver more than 100 pounds of goods to customers in urban centers where vehicles either can’t go due to traffic congestion or can’t park due to high cost in time and money.

Who:
Creators at NTS Works, a start-up company based in Santa Cruz, Calif., are using their experience as founders, inventors, designers and battery technology developers at Zero Motorcycles to produce the 2×4 (pronounced “two-by-four”) electric cargo delivery bicycle.

Where and When:

–  NTS Works founder and CEO Neal Saiki will be in San Jose/San Francisco
on Wednesday, Sept. 4 and Thursday, Sept. 5 with the 2×4 Cargo Bike.
–  Neal will be available for media interviews to talk about the bike and
his experience as founder of NTS Works, and his technical and business
background as founder of Zero Motorcycles.
–  Neal can be reached by mobile phone at 831.247.2015, or via email:
neal@NTSWorks.com; media inquiries can be directed to Michael Coates
(408.399.9081 or mcoates@mightycomm.com or Tom Fulks (916.508.3837 or
tfulks@mightycomm.com) of Mightycomm.
Why:

–  Technology story:
–  The 2×4 Cargo Bike’s revolutionary design carries up to eight bags
of groceries, or more than 100 pounds of cargo.
–  It handles just like a regular bike under load. What sets 2×4 Cargo
Bike apart from other delivery bikes is the new and unique way of
steering the cargo. The patent-pending steering mechanism – unlike
anything currently available in the biking world – places the cargo
load directly over the front wheel for the best possible balance,
handling and maneuverability in tight urban environments.
–  The 2×4 pedal assist senses the rider’s energy/power needs and adds
three levels of power for flats, hills and acceleration.
–  The 2×4′s battery technology uses the highest quality lithium ion
cells available, with 500 watt hours for a real world range of 30
miles. The battery has a lifetime warranty, which no other e-bike
maker offers.
–  The 2×4 Cargo Bike is a real bicycle, in that it requires pedaling
to move forward. A steady and maintainable workout is provided to
the rider regardless of cycling skill. The 2×4′s smart pedal sensor
design provides just enough juice to get up grades without the rider
having to get out of the saddle, stand on the pedals and grind out a
sweaty climb.
–  Entrepreneur story: Neal Saiki is the founder of Zero Motorcycles, a
successful electric motorcycle company, and an inventor (battery
technology is one of his areas of expertise). Neal is a lifelong cyclist
and has applied his knowledge to designing and building an electric
bicycle that works for the task at hand and meets a need at a reasonable
price.
–  Environmental story: The 2×4 Cargo Bike is on the leading edge for
environmentally sound local delivery in urban areas, offering zero
emissions, pedal power with an electric assist (for hills, etc.), new
battery technology and a new, smart way to deliver goods in congested
urban centers.
–  Coolness story: This is a really great bike. You’ve just got to see it
to appreciate the creative design and ride it under load to appreciate
how totally awesome it is.
SOURCE  NTS Works

Photo:http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130904/SF74110
http://photoarchive.ap.org/
NTS Works

CONTACT: Michael Coates, 408.399.9081mcoates@mightycommunications.com

Web Site: http://www.zeromotorcycles.com

When You Put Your Obsolete TV Out on the Sidewalk, You Shouldn’t Tell People that it’s FREE!!! – Or IT WORKS!!!!!

Wednesday, January 30th, 2013

The reason is that your old analog CRT TV now has a negative value.

Yes, I know you paid “good money” for it, but that was then and this is now.

These days it’s worth less than zero.

That’s why you put it out on the sidewalks of the Western Addition PJ’s, right?

So if you want to tell tout le monde that your obsolete device still functions, don’t use any exclamation points.

Click to expand

That is all.

Oh, and where’s the remote?

Photos from Asian Art Museum’s “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection” – Opens June 2013

Thursday, September 20th, 2012

Here’s the big news from Kenneth Baker yesterday.

More deets:

“Called “In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection,” the exhibit will include works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573—1615) and Edo (1615—1868) periods along a 13th—14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.”

This should be an excellent show.

All photos courtesy of the Asian Art Museum:

Shotoku Taishi as an Infant, Unknown, Kamakura period (1249-1335). Wood with polychromy. Larry Ellison Collection

Tigers (detail), 1779. By Maruyama Okyo (Japanese, 1733-1795). One of a pair of hanging scrolls; ink and light colors on paper. Larry Ellison Collection.

Auspicious Pine, Bamboo, Plum, Crane and Turtles, Edo period (1615-1868),ca. 1630-1650. By Kano Sansetsu (Japanese, 1590-1651,By Sansetsu, Kano 1590-1651. One of a pair of six panel folding screens. Ink and colors on gold. Larry Ellison Collection

Oh, and don’t forget about Korean Culture Day this Sunday, September 23, 2012. It’s free!

“IN THE MOMENT: JAPANESE ART FROM THE LARRY ELLISON COLLECTION
Asian Art Museum debuts Ellison’s Japanese art collection, coinciding with 2013 America’s Cup

SAN FRANCISCO, September 20, 2012—Next summer, as the America’s Cup Challenger Series takes to San Francisco Bay, the Asian Art Museum will feature an exhibition of Japanese art from the rarely seen collection of Larry Ellison, Oracle CEO and owner of ORACLE TEAM USA, defender of the 2013 America’s Cup.

In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection will introduce approximately 80 exceptional artworks spanning 1,300 years. The exhibition explores the dynamic nature of art selection and display in traditional Japanese settings, where artworks are often temporarily presented in response to a special occasion or to reflect the change of seasons. In the Moment also considers Mr. Ellison’s active involvement in displaying art in his Japanese-style home, shedding light on his appreciation for Japan’s art and culture.

Included in the exhibition are significant works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573–1615) and Edo (1615–1868) periods along with other important examples of religious art, lacquer, woodwork, and metalwork. Highlights include a 13th–14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.

“This exhibition offers a rare glimpse of an extraordinary collection,” said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. “We aim to present it in a fresh and original way that explores traditional Japanese principles governing the relationship of art to our surroundings and social relationships.”

The exhibition is organized by the Asian Art Museum and curated by Dr. Laura Allen, the museum’s curator of Japanese art, and Melissa Rinne, associate curator of Japanese art, in consultation with Mr. Ellison’s curator, Dr. Emily Sano.

The exhibition is on view June 28, 2013 through September 22, 2013. The Asian Art Museum will serve as the only venue for the exhibition.

For more information visit: www.asianart.org

Giant Broadway Tunnel “Reverse-Graffiti” Advertising Mural for “Green Works” Cleansers Attacked Once Again

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012

I guess you can still see part of it, but the lower reaches and the “Green Works” logo are long gone.

See?

Click to expand

Oh well.

reverse graffiti

San Francisco’s Broadway tunnel is a highly traveled thoroughfare in the heart of the city. Over 20,000 cars, trucks, and motorized vehicles pass through it per day. Its walls are caked with dirt and soot, and lined with patches of paint covered graffiti from days gone by. It set the perfect canvas to create a beautiful work of art showcasing the talents of reverse graffiti artist “Moose”, and the power of Green Works plant based cleaner.

How San Francisco’s Cable Cars Work

Saturday, January 31st, 2009

Beneath this slot is the cable that makes everything go. There are three braking systems to slow things down. And, instead of a horn, there’s a bell.  

via pbo31 Click to expand

If you get good with the bell, you can enter the annual Cable Car Bell Ringing Contest in Union Square. And if you win a lot, you’ll be like Carl Payne. See his ring bling?

So, that’s how cable cars work.