Posts Tagged ‘world class’

Announcing San Francisco’s “Entrepreneurship-in-Residence” (EIR) Program – Only “World-Class” Entrepreneurs Need Apply

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Remember Oskar Schindler and the Third Reich? Would you consider that whole deal a successful “public-private partnership?” I mean, was it “world-class?” Did it address “government pain points?” IDK.

Anyway, here’s the latest – I didn’t see this one coming. (Perhaps Con Ronway did. IDK.)

“SAN FRANCISCO MAYOR ANNOUNCES PROGRAM TO INTRODUCE WORLD-CLASS ENTREPRENEURS TO THE $142 BILLION PUBLIC SECTOR MARKET

Mayor Ed Lee invites entrepreneurs to develop technology-enabled products and services for government, the largest consumer of products and services in the nation

SAN FRANCISCO – September 6th, 2013 – Mayor Edwin M. Lee, in collaboration with the White House and other strategic partners, today announced San Francisco’s Entrepreneurship-in-Residence (EIR) program. “We need the top entrepreneurs to work with us on opportunities that are actual pain points and needs of government. San Francisco’s EIR program advances our role and vision as the Innovation Capital of the World,” said Mayor Ed Lee.

The program is inspired by President Obama’s call, “We’ve got to have the brightest minds to help solve our biggest challenges.” San Francisco’s EIR program will select talented entrepreneurial teams and help them develop technology-enabled products and services that can capitalize on the $142 billion public sector market.

“San Francisco’s program is one of the first EIR programs within government, who is by far, the largest customer of products and services in the nation,” commented Jay Nath, San Francisco’s Chief Innovation Officer. “The entrepreneurial products and services developed through San Francisco’s EIR program should drive significant impact such as increased revenue, enhanced productivity or meaningful cost savings.”

The program plans to attract world-class entrepreneurs and technologists by providing them with direct access to government needs and opportunities, staff and their expertise, in addition to product development, ramp-up support, and insights into a gold mine of government problems and opportunities through the City and County of San Francisco.

“Products and services that successfully solve issues faced by San Francisco can easily expand to addressing similar needs of other cities and states across the nation in addition to the private sector,” said Rahul Mewawalla, a senior executive with leadership experiences across Fortune 500 and high growth companies who is leading the program. “We expect to drive significant innovation and growth in areas of pressing importance such as data, mobile and cloud services, healthcare, education, transportation, energy and infrastructure.”

San Francisco’s EIR program will offer selected teams mentorship from senior public leaders across the Mayor’s office and San Francisco departments and from private sector leaders with experience at companies such as McKinsey & Company, Nokia, NBC Universal, General Electric, Yahoo!, and Goldman Sachs. The program expects to select 3 to 5 teams and announce the selected teams in early October, during San Francisco’s Innovation Month. The program will run 16 weeks from mid-October, 2013 through mid-February, 2014.

Entrepreneurial teams are invited to learn more and apply at http://entrepreneur.sfgov.org http://entrepreneur.sfgov.org

What We’re Looking For

  1. Your product or service should address areas of topical relevance to the public sector (e.g. related to data, healthcare, transportation, education, energy, infrastructure, mobile and civic engagement, public assets, etc.)
  2. Your team should be pursuing an opportunity that has large economic potential ($100M+ market) and significant impact potential (increased revenue, enhanced productivity, meaningful cost savings, etc.).
  3. Your product or service should be technology enabled and have broad applicability across SF and other cities and states and across public and private sector customers.
  4. Preference is given for products or services in advanced stages of development and rollout or existing products that could also address government needs. If you are in a position to build out the product or service within 16 weeks, that is fine as well.
  5. Your product shows promise to be self-sustainable.
  6. Your team demonstrates high likelihood of success based on prior professional and personal experiences.
  7. Preference for teams over sole individuals; if sole individual, please elaborate on how you will build a team and accomplish program objectives within 16 weeks.

Example Government Pain Points

The following are just examples of problems facing government. Applicants do not have to solve these particular problems. It is most important to clearly demonstrate how your product could benefit from this program and that it can solve a real challenge.

  • How can we better leverage the growth in open data and enable easier data mining and analysis to enable better decisions?
  • How can we better utilize our public assets to generate additional revenue?
  • How can we make available better healthcare choices and services given the upcoming implementation of the affordable healthcare act?
  • How can we improve our recruiting and hiring applications for more efficient and productive hiring?
  • How can we improve transportation efficiencies to improve transit times and reduce costs?
  • How can we track and optimize our energy purchases and usage?
  • How can we improve our asset tracking system across real estate, fleet, equipment, etc to increase usage, lower costs and enhance utilization?
  • How can we use a digital public notification system for urban interventions and streetscape improvements to help local businesses and their growth?

What You Can Expect

The selection process will be through an open and competitive application process. Applications will be used to assess the qualifications, fit and likelihood of success of the applicants.

Selection will be made by SF EIR selection group composed of public and private sector leaders with innovation, Fortune 500, startup and venture capital experience.

We will be reviewing applications on a rolling basis. It is in the applicant’s best interest to apply early. We will announce selected teams in early October, with the program beginning in mid-October and wrapping up in mid-February.

MENTORS

Entrepreneurs can expect to have access to a range of experts and advisors in the private and public sectors. These industry and government leaders will help your team define and achieve success in the civic innovation space with San Francisco agencies and departments as your key focus group and customers over the four month program. Below are just a handful of currently committed mentors.

San Francisco is So Rich We Can Afford to Light Up the Giant Market Street “VIRGIN” Sign in Perpetuity?

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

Here’s the reverse-angle, at night, from Market Street near the Union Square Apple Store.

It’s the giant neon sign for our long-closed Virgin Megastore:

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Now didn’t I talk about this just last month? So why is this sign still burning brightly 24-7? There’s no actual Megasto any mo, right? Has this store sign become an ad for the Virgin Empire? Does somebody turn the sign off on Christmas to honor the Baby Jesus ‘n stuff? Does the City and County of San Francisco pay for the juice to power it?

I know not.

The juice, the precious juice

Uh, Who Pays for the Electricity to Power the Giant VIRGIN Sign on the Side of Our Long-Shutdown Virgin Megastore?

Tuesday, January 17th, 2012

You see, our world-class City (go ahead, Google the terms ”ed lee” “world class” right now) used to have a world-class Virgin Megastore at the world-class intersection of world-class Market Street and world-class Stockton Street.

But then our Virgin reka sto shut down, a while ago, actually.

But now the sign is still burning brightly, wasting the electricity that San Francisco stole from the rest of California fair and square back when Hetch Hetchy got built.

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Bon courage, Virgin Megastore sign.

May you shine forever.

2012 Update: “The Revitalization of Mid-Market”

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

Via The Tens:

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Yep, pretty much.

Ooh, Harsh: City Attorney Dennis Herrera Throws Down – Goes After Ed Lee’s Failed Record on Infrastructure

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

Turns out that our “world-class City” is ranked below Boston, New York, Oakland, San Jose, and Seattle, believe it or not. See below.

Now, just how purple do you want to see your fighting City Attorney.

Better A, as seen here?

Or B, after a little Replace Color and Shadows/Highlights?

You Make The Call.

Now, a little background and then the News of the Day. Let’s list the endnotes first for a change – they are that good:

[1] Government Barometer: August 2011, City and County of San Francisco, Office of the Controller, City Services Auditor, October 18, 2011, http://www.sfcontroller.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=2581
[2] City and County of San Francisco City Survey 2011, Final Report, prepared by the ETC Institute, October 6, 2011, http://www.sfcontroller.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=2573
[3] Voter Information Pamphlet, Nov. 8, 2011, Proposition B: Road Repaving and Street Safety Bonds, page 46, http://www.sfgov2.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/elections/NOV2011_VIP_EN.pdf
[4] Management Audit of the Department of Public Works, by the San Francisco Budget Analyst, January 9, 2007, http://www.sfdpw.org/ftp/uploadedfiles/sfdpw/director/DPWAuditReport.pdf

The latest from the Dennis Herrera for Mayor campaign:

“New Controller’s report confirms streets survey, audit on Ed Lee’s failed record on infrastructure

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

Appointed Mayor’s decade-long mismanagement as DPW chief, City Administrator now require quarter-billion dollar streets bond to ‘finally accomplish what Ed Lee didn’t’

SAN FRANCISCO (Oct. 18, 2011) — City streets and public works continue to deteriorate under interim Mayor Ed Lee, according to a new report published today by the Controller’s Office, extending Lee’s decade-long record of mismanagement and neglect as the appointed bureaucrat in charge of San Francisco’s infrastructure. Today’s bimonthly Government Barometer[1] mirrors a highly critical survey released just two weeks ago that found San Francisco’s satisfaction rate with the current quality of its infrastructure to be the lowest among five benchmark cities to which it was compared. Lee’s history of lax oversight of streets, sidewalks and public works projects was also the subject of a devastating independent management audit of the Department of Public Works that the Board of Supervisors first commissioned in May 2005, while Lee was DPW director. That audit was released in 2007.

Today’s new Government Barometer identified negative trends in the City’s maintenance of streets and public works in terms of the percentage of street cleaning requests responded to within 48 hours, which have worsened both since the previous reporting period and as compared to the same period last year. A negative trend was also observed from the previous reporting period for the percentage of graffiti requests on public property responded to within 48 hours.

“For the last decade, Ed Lee did an abysmal job as the person in charge of San Francisco’s infrastructure,” said City Attorney Dennis Herrera. “The Budget Analyst’s audit proved it in 2007; the streets survey proved it again two weeks ago, and the new Government Barometer proves it once again. Ed Lee’s record of failure is why most city streets are dirtier than ever, and in desperate need of major repairs. Now, San Franciscans need to pass a quarter-billion dollars for a streets bond, to finally accomplish what Ed Lee didn’t.”

Lee was DPW director from 2000 to 2005, and until January of this year served as City Administrator, a role whose major duties under the City Charter include coordinating capital improvement and construction projects, and appointing and removing DPW directors. As such, Lee is more responsible for the current state of San Francisco’s infrastructure than any other city official. Lee’s decade-long record contrasts starkly with his new campaign promise to be an “infrastructure mayor” who will fix San Francisco’s “roads, schools and parks.”

On October 6, 2011, the San Francisco Controller’s Office published its final report of the biennial City Survey for 2011[2], which found that:

* San Francisco had the lowest satisfaction rate with the quality of its infrastructure among five benchmark cities to which it was compared: Boston, New York, Oakland, San Jose, and Seattle.

* Overall satisfaction with San Francisco city streets, sidewalks, and infrastructure rated a woeful 31 percent, according to the survey — far below other cities. In fact, San Francisco’s rating for infrastructure was also lower than both statewide and national averages.

* San Franciscans were least satisfied with the condition of pavement citywide, with nearly 44 percent of residents grading city performance “poor/failing,” and another 38 percent describing it as merely “average.” Only 18 percent rated infrastructure “good” or better.

The new Government Barometer and streets survey from two weeks ago come as San Franciscans begin voting on a proposed $248 million bond for road repaving and street safety.[3] The nearly one-quarter-billion-dollars in new bonded indebtedness is required, according to proponents, because half of San Francisco’s 850 miles of streets — together with public structures that include bridges, tunnels, and stairways — need major repairs and upgrades.

Both the Government Barometer and streets survey also mirror a devastating independent audit of DPW that the Board of Supervisors commissioned in May 2005, while Lee was DPW chief. Even before Budget Analyst Harvey Rose’s final 269-page DPW Management Audit[4] was published in January 9, 2007, then-DPW Chief Fred Abadi responded that he “came to DPW after your audit had begun,” and that the report’s 120 recommendations “will prove useful to me as I continue to reengineer parts of the Department.” Abadi agreed and accepted all but three of the Budget Analyst’s 120 recommendations.

Among major findings of the performance audit’s of DPW under Ed Lee:

* DPW’s overall mismanagement, inefficiency and uncollected revenue combined to waste more than $5 million in taxpayer funds.

* DPW-led projects were routinely mismanaged, over-budget, and late — and city street repair projects were late by a shocking 172 days, on average.

* DPW failed to routinely track average project labor costs or productivity to ensure that Street Resurfacing and Pothole Repair Projects were completed efficiently

* DPW could not demonstrate that tax dollars being spent for street repair and maintenance (despite an amount that increased during Lee’s tenure) were spent appropriately.

* DPW allowed more than $1 million in litter fines to go uncollected.

* None of DPW’s eight bureaus fully measured performance to ensure that the bureau achieved the best possible outcomes.

* And DPW inspectors did not conduct routine inspections of streets to identify safety hazards.”

5-7-2 on Front Street: America’s Cup 2013 Starting Early? – A “Windfall” for Some, But Not For All

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

Get used to seeing boats coming and going around town over the next year or two.

Like this:

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Forgive me for not jumping on the bandwagon, for not joining in with the mindless cheerleading.

The fact is that our America’s Cup deal was negotiated poorly. Can anybody deny that? O.K. then.

Now, do you want to say that all this rigmarole is a net positive for the 415 anyway? Well, that’s up in the air.

If you personally get a gig for a number of months, you know, setting up and maintaining port-a-potties and whatnot, then somebody could call that an exercise in “creating jobs,” I suppose. So good for you.

But to compare the famously corrupt Salt Lake City Olympics, or any Olympics, with our AC13, well, that’s not a good thing, is it?

Maybe Larry’s Boat Race will be just like an especially small Olympiad?

Although the accounting methods of Olympic organizing committees are often murky, the evidence further suggests that all of the last six Winter Olympics ended up losing money. The organizers of the Turin Games in 2006 admitted to a $32 million deficit. And while organizers of the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics boasted an operating profit of $110 million, the U.S. General Accounting Office determined that the federal government contributed $1.3 billion toward the event. Plagued by cost overruns, the 1998 Nagano Olympics also lost huge piles of dough, though no one knows exactly how much because the organizers burned the accounting books, leaving the financial impact a mystery.”

So, do I have an inventory of all the land mines what are hidden in the agreement that was negotiated? Not yet, but brace yourselves for them…

In the meantime, study up on all the Eurotrash what are racing the boats. Which collection of Euros are you going to be rooting for?

And dig up your old NCAA uniform. It still fits!

And then bone up on your two-legs-good, four-legs-bad style chanting:

natural amphitheater

world-class 

Go, Eurotrash, go!

Larry Ellison is NOT the biggest fucking douchebag on the entire planet

Hurray!

The Following Crutch Phrases Have Been Banned in San Francisco for 2011: World-Class, Win-Win and Natural Amphitheatre

Friday, January 21st, 2011

1. The phrase “world-class” is meaningless. It’s generally uttered by those who don’t know what they’re talking but, for some reason, feel compelled to talk.

2. Agreements, almost by definition, are meant to provide benefit to both sides of a transaction. Calling any particular agreement a “win-win” is like calling water wet.

3. San Francisco, simply, is not a “natural amphitheatre.” Sorry.

All right, whenever you’re away from the City and County, try to use all three in a sentence:

It’s roomfuls of thirsty admen that have given us all sorts of cool, meaningless phrases like that.

- Corinthian leather.

- Natural beechwood aging

- Tastes great, less filling

San Francisco’s Most Overused Cliche of the Decade: “World-Class”

Thursday, September 10th, 2009

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Oh Lord, if I ever see or hear the clicheworld-class” again, it will be too soon. But now, They’re using the Phrase That Shant Be Named twice in the same monkey-fighting sentence:

A world-class city like San Francisco needs a world-class boulevard. We’re optimistic this plan will lead to a renaissance of Market Street,’ said Nathan Ballard, Newsom’s spokesman.’”

Now first of all, we already have a “world-class boulevard” – it’s called Octavia and it’s turning out to be a public policy disaster.

Second of all, “world-class: cliché (avoid)”:

wc copy

Now, do you want to use this phrase the way it was meant to be, like saying that Cleveland has a world-class symphony orchestra. I don’t know if that’s true or if it even ever was, but it’s surprising that a sub-million-population city like Cleveland would have such a good symphony so world-class is apropropriate, right? And indeed, the same could be said for the San Francisco Ballet, which acquits itself quite nicely considering S.F. is the fourth-biggest (and fallingSacramento, where you at Sacramento?) city in the state. 

But I mean, does everything in town have to be world-class? The Strybing Arboretum? Really? “Just look at that tree, man, that’s one monkey-fighting world-class tree!”

Or, how about:

“A world-class boyfriend like me needs a world-class omelette, don’t you think, honey?”

Oh, how they must laugh at us:

I despise the hackneyed phrase “world-class.” It’s a tired cliché supposed to inspire and excite where it only deadens and dulls the senses. In a world where everything is touted as “world-class”, nothing is exceptional or intimate.”

“Here’s my deal: I’m a world-class talking head. I’ve made my bones and I’ve got all my bona fides.”

“Is there anybody else who winces at the use of “world class”

What would the Encyclopedia of Business Cliches say about us? Nothing good, that’s for sure.  

Or Gaia, maybe She could help with this issue. Yes, Divine Intervention will be required at this point.

Or you know, Whomever, just please make it stop.

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