Posts Tagged ‘wsj’

What’s This, the NeMA Building Version of The Bachelor? Software-American Kyle Zink Stars in Unusual WSJ Ad

Friday, January 10th, 2014

Here it is, writer Sarah Tilton’s latest in the Wall Street Journal:

How Techies Are Transforming San Francisco - A generation of technology workers is bringing startups, venture capitalists—and high real-estate prices.”

And here’s a Dewar’s Profile of a NeMa Building resident who doesn’t seem embarrassed to live there.

Kicking it on the rooftop with a nice mug of Smitten Brand Ice Cream no doubt:

Click to expand

What It Looks Like When Our CIA Places Banner Ads – “STRENGTHENED BY YOUR UNIQUENESS, EMPOWERED BY YOUR POTENTIAL”

Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

It looks like this:

O RLY? Oakland Mayor Jean Quan on Her Handling of Occupy: “Mistakes Were Made” – A Big WSJ Article on Recall Efforts

Thursday, December 1st, 2011

The Great Wall Street Journal Pay Wall isn’t fully operational right now, so that means that you can follow the lead of SF Bay Area Observer’s Ron Russell by checking out today’s bit from Bobby White in the Wall Street Journal:

Occupy Flap Prompts Oakland Recall Drive

Or at least I think you can get to it for free.

I could, anyway. See?

Now check it:

In an interview, Ms. Quan acknowledged that “Occupy has damaged downtown businesses and mistakes were made.” Still, she said, she believes most voters back her and “I do not believe that most of the businesses in the city agree with this recall campaign.” The 62-year-old Ms. Quan, who was elected in late 2010, added that Oakland’s ethnically based chamber of commerce organizations support her, as do major businesses in the city such as Pandora Media Inc. and Kaiser Permanente.

Is that an apology? (Your Bromide of the Day: As goes Pandora Media, so goes Alameda County.)

And there’s this:

Corey Cook, an associate professor of politics at the University of San Francisco, said until Oakland’s recall effort becomes more structured, he is uncertain if it will succeed. Still, he said, “To go from being an unpopular leader to one worthy of recall requires a very public failure, and it seems [Ms. Quan] has accomplished that.”

Ouch.

We’ll know more by the end of next week.

On It Goes…

The Wall Street Journal’s New San Francisco Edition is Welcomed With Open Arms

Thursday, November 5th, 2009

OMG it’s here, it’s finally here! On the heels of the new Bay Area Blog and Bay Area Edition from the New York Times comes the Wall Street Journal ‘s expanded entry into the San Francisco Bay Area market.

Let’s see here, bay areans now have our own webpage at wsj.com and we also have OneSpot - “San Francisco Stories from Around the Web.” And those pages point you to local content, such as this outrageous, 900+ pixel wide photo essay about Haight Ashbury. (Dig the crazy colors, man.)

wsj copy

Give us More, I say. Hang those who talk of less 

All right. Expect good things.

Bon courage, WSJ!

China’s Olympic Legacy – No More International Torch Relays

Friday, March 27th, 2009

Well that’s the news of the day – in light of the fiasco that was the 2008 Olympic International Torch Relay, the International Olympic Committee has just announced that there aint going to any more of those anytime soon. So, it’s going to be host-country relays only. Per the New York Times:

“The I.O.C. hopes to avoid the ugly scenes that erupted in San Francisco, Paris and London last year.” 

O.K. then. Here’s how the torch relay on the Streets of San Francisco looked last year, when official torch bearer Andrew Michael, seen seated in a wheelchair below, managed to get some attention by displaying a Tibetan flag:

But, OMG, he signed a contract saying he wouldn’t express hisself like that. OMG, HE SIGNED A CONTRACT with Coca Cola or somebody and then when against it. Can you imagine? If only the Sacred Flame Protection Squad had been at full force that day, they could have pushed over his wheelchair, or given him a beatdown, or manhandled him the way they did with fellow torchbearer Majora Carter

Anyway, there’s your Chinese Olympic Legacy.